forest stand

forest stand

[′fär·əst ‚stand]
(forestry)
The basic unit of forest mapping; a group of trees that are more or less homogeneous with regard to species composition, density, size, and sometimes habitat.
References in classic literature ?
A people who would begin by burning the fences and let the forest stand! I saw the fences half consumed, their ends lost in the middle of the prairie, and some worldly miser with a surveyor looking after his bounds, while heaven had taken place around him, and he did not see the angels going to and fro, but was looking for an old post-hole in the midst of paradise.
And winter is the best time to inventory the composition and structure of each forest stand.
"There are many ways landowners can utilize conservation practices to restore the ecological function of the Cross Timbers habitat including but not limited to: brush management, forest stand improvement, prescribed burning, prescribed grazing, and habitat plantings," said Dustin Lamoreaux, a Pheasants and Quail Forever wildlife biologist.
The Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau (ERDB) has labeled tamayuan as an 'individual plus tree,' as it is a natural forest stand.
The topics include silviculture systems, ecological principles basic to silviculture, measures of stand density and structure, managing even-aged stands, forest stand nutrition and fertilization, fire and silviculture, and case histories.
Multiaged Silviculture: Managing for Complex Forest Stand Structures
Thus, the most popular polypores species on living oaks in coppice oakeries of South-Western Central Russian Upland are those for which oak is a principal, not facultative host; besides, they have effective parasitic properties and can spread in a forest stand from tree to tree effectively.
We also used a Geographic Information System (digital orthophotos and ArcView, version 3.2a, Environmental Systems Research Institute, Redlands, California) to measure additional variables, i.e., percentage of area covered by the four main categories of use of land (e.g., open area, forest stand under management, mature forest, and plantation) in each of the 16 plots.
Five standard sampling plots (20 x 20 [m.sup.2]) were established in each forest stand in December 2009, and the height and breast height diameter of every tree were measured in the sampling plots.
So it's really the density of very large old trees that are draped in moss that is important at a forest stand level.
As the land cover map did not include forest age, we also used a forestry map with data on forest stand age and tree species composition provided by the Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute (Gjertsen 2007).

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