forestage


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forestage

1. That part of a theater stage which is on the audience side of the proscenium or stage curtain.
2.See apron, 8.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in the scenes of the past these boundaries are broken, and characters enter or leave a room by stepping 'through' a wall onto the forestage.
2] Regen Regeneration habitat Proportion Regen variation Regeneration variation Proportion Ccvar Crown closure variation Proportion Elevation Mean elevation Meters Forestage Forest age Years Tri Terrain ruggedness Unitless Predicted relationships Name Survival BCI Biological/capture Age 0 0 Sex + (Females) 0 Fcubs 0 -- Julian day 0 0 Ncaps 0 -- Anthropogenic/habitat Roads -- 0 Regen -- 0 Regen variation -- 0 Ccvar 0 0 Elevation 0 -- Forestage 0 -- Tri 0 -- Table 3.
This jukebox show opens with a spotlight revealing a forestage entirely bare but for a single item: a jukebox.
But when she eventually steps down from the forestage and sets foot on shore, either to go to the settlement or onto the sandbank, at the end of the novel she faces reality again and loses her acquired identity, her glamorous aura.
Repertoire was worked out on Symphony Hall's unattractive, unadorned forestage backed by the Royal Ballet's Symphonia (lyrical violin playing from its leader, Robert Gibbs) and its conductor Aaron Sherber -a man devoid of charisma, who managed (by playing it in the slowest speed imaginable) to turn Sibelius's Valse Triste into Valse Funebre .
Samuele, a patrician who had already garnered the gratitude of Goldoni for having lodged him in his home, married Catterina Loredan, the Doge's only granddaughter: among the friends that Mocenigo invited to the great wedding banquet held in the Ducal Palace was also the author of L'Amor della Patria, who on that convivial occasion also had the opportunity to make a sort of forestage parade among the patricians, who overwhelmed him with courtesies.
The theatrical benefit night was a tradition established in London, where benefits also often drew large numbers of "quality" and involved constructing boxes for the ladies on the forestage or in the pit (Scouten lxi-lxii).
The stage directions for the closing scene in the published version of Death of a Salesman indicate that all of the remaining characters should move out onto the forestage through the wall-line of the kitchen in order to stand around the grave of Willy Loman.
Consequently, at a time when the depiction of violence in visual media assumes forestage in critical debates, the close connection between identity, violence and narrative makes a study of violence and cultural production imperative.
Editing might contrast forestage and backstage spaces, but only the duration of a take and the mobility of the camera can pass continuously from one behaviorally-defined space to the other.
Built in 1966 as a multipurpose theater, the Loretto-Hilton features a forestage thirty-one feet wide by thirteen feet deep in front of an upstage area fifty-eight feet wide by twenty-one feet deep.
The sliding scrim panels allow the action to spill from behind the screen onto the forestage, for projected images to overlap the bodies of living actors, and for a crisp division of foreground action from the gauzy upstage landscape of half-seen imagery - the roots of history and memory.