forestage


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forestage

1. That part of a theater stage which is on the audience side of the proscenium or stage curtain.
2.See apron, 8.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He can do so because of "Congreve's signature playwriting technique," his preference to present "action upon the forestage with pairs of characters" (129).
But in the scenes of the past these boundaries are broken, and characters enter or leave a room by stepping 'through' a wall onto the forestage." Miller's dramaturgy makes for temporal fluidity a well as spatial one, and in it thematic, spatial and temporal concerns are all merged into forming an excitingly novel and yet coherent picture.
Covariates considered Units Name Description Biological/capture Age Bear age at capture Integer Sex Bear sex [male] or [female] Fcubs Females with cubs Binary Julian day Relative change in Numeric date of yearly capture Ncaps Number of live captures Integer Anthropogenic/habitat Roads Road density Road km/ [km.sup.2] Regen Regeneration habitat Proportion Regen variation Regeneration variation Proportion Ccvar Crown closure variation Proportion Elevation Mean elevation Meters Forestage Forest age Years Tri Terrain ruggedness Unitless Predicted relationships Name Survival BCI Biological/capture Age 0 0 Sex + (Females) 0 Fcubs 0 -- Julian day 0 0 Ncaps 0 -- Anthropogenic/habitat Roads -- 0 Regen -- 0 Regen variation -- 0 Ccvar 0 0 Elevation 0 -- Forestage 0 -- Tri 0 -- Table 3.
The symphony forestage was programmed from mid-afternoon by Michael Sollis.
3) suggests performance conditions by depicting four overhead chandeliers and a forestage abutting the parterre; the Le Pautre screen (fig.
Between them and the proscenium there intervened a 20-foot gulf, walled with wood on the audience side, which variously accommodated a forestage, an orchestra pit, or a flight of steps.
To our surprise, we were able to effectively light the forestage and let the rest of the cottage recede into darkness.
(9) The projecting edge of a platform, also called the forestage (or apron) had been shortened so as to be pushed back into the shell of the theatre and in its place was put the orchestra pit which is still to be found in more or less the same position across the world even if in different manifestations.
(Looking at the beard, slowly walking forestage, touching his own face and eyes) Where are his eyes?
This jukebox show opens with a spotlight revealing a forestage entirely bare but for a single item: a jukebox.
But when she eventually steps down from the forestage and sets foot on shore, either to go to the settlement or onto the sandbank, at the end of the novel she faces reality again and loses her acquired identity, her glamorous aura.
Hence it must be interpreted as a forestage. The introduction of these two elements changes the picture from an illustration into a theatrical tableau, and this helps to explain the studied appearance of the still-life objects to a high degree of finish [sic], and placed them with a deliberateness that appears to elevate them from the mundane to the divine." (Brown 76) Just as the detailing and positioning of the objects in Zurbaran cannot hide their theatricality, it is Costanza's extraordinary physical appearance and demeanor, in contrast to her prosaic surroundings, that reveals her symbolic nature.