forfeit

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forfeit

1. Law something confiscated as a penalty for an offence, breach of contract, etc.
2. 
a. a game in which a player has to give up an object, perform a specified action, etc., if he commits a fault
b. an object so given up
References in classic literature ?
Just as the question came to Rose, Jamie's voice was heard in the hall, crying distressfully, "Oh, come quick, quick!" Rose started up, missed the question, and was greeted with a general cry of "Forfeit! forfeit!" in which the little traitor came to join.
Charles Evremonde, called Darnay, was accused by the public prosecutor as an emigrant, whose life was forfeit to the Republic, under the decree which banished all emigrants on pain of Death.
"Another forfeit for a Gallicism," said a Russian writer who was present.
Casaubon marries you she is to forfeit all her property?"
At that period (so soon after the forty-five) there were many exiled gentlemen coming back at the peril of their lives, either to see their friends or to collect a little money; and as for the Highland chiefs that had been forfeited, it was a common matter of talk how their tenants would stint themselves to send them money, and their clansmen outface the soldiery to get it in, and run the gauntlet of our great navy to carry it across.
I crave the law, The penalty and forfeit of my bond.
"I shall forfeit my situation," he said, "if I do it."
I can only prevent her from taking some desperate step on her side -- some step by which she may forfeit the friendship and protection of the excellent people with whom she is now living -- by reminding her that if Mrs.
He paid her only the compliment of attention; and she felt a respect for him on the occasion, which the others had reasonably forfeited by their shameless want of taste.
If you refuse, I swear that your head shall pay forfeit."
They have here a particular way of punishing adultery; a woman convicted of that crime is condemned to forfeit all her fortune, is turned out of her husband's house, in a mean dress, and is forbid ever to enter it again; she has only a needle given her to get her living with.
Meanwhile I should be subjected to no discomfort that was not necessary to preclude escape, and, unless I forfeited the privilege by misconduct, I should be occasionally permitted to see my brother who had preceded me to my prison.