formation fracturing

formation fracturing

[fȯr′mā·shən ′frak·chə·riŋ]
(petroleum engineering)
Method of applying hydraulic pressure to a reservoir formation to cause the rock to split open, that is, to fracture; used to increase oil production.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assuming that average Poisson's ratio, v for most reservoir rocks equal to 0.25, the formation fracturing pressure gradient (computed using Equation 13) equals to 0.67 psi/ft.
During pipe trip-in, large hole diameter provides bigger passage area for the mud, therefore, the piston-cylinder action acting opposite to the formation is minimized and the formation fracturing can be avoided as shown in Figure 6 (Hole size).
* Corresponding Author E-mail: uduak.mme@ntnu.no Table 1: Matlab Code Input Data Parameter Value or Range Unit Mud weight, [rho] 8.5-12.5 ppg Mud plastic viscosity, [[mu].sub.p] 15-55 Mud yield point, [Y.sub.p] 5-200 Ib/100sq.ft Well depth, h 6000-15000 ft Hole size, [d.sub.h] 7.875-9.875 inches Drillcollars-to-drillpipe ratio 0.0345-0.1538 fraction Drill pipe size (ID,OD) 3.826, 4.5 inches Drillcollars size (ID,OD) 2.813, 6.75 inches Drill string tripping speed 0-18 ft/sec Formation pore fluid pressure gradient 0.45 Psi/ft Formation fracturing pressure gradient 0.67 Psi/ft Poisson's ratio 0.25 fraction

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