Foster

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Foster

1. Jodie. born 1962, US film actress and director: her films include Taxi Driver (1976), The Accused (1988), The Silence of the Lambs (1990), Little Man Tate (1991; also directed), Nell (1995), and Panic Room (2002)
2. Norman, Baron. born 1935, British architect. His works include the Willis Faber building (1978) in Ipswich, Stansted Airport, Essex (1991), Chek Lap Kok Airport, Hong Kong (1998), the renovation of the Reichstag, Berlin (1999), and City Hall, London (2002)
3. Stephen Collins. 1826--64, US composer of songs such as The Old Folks at Home and Oh Susanna
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
Then began the hard years for Tom Foster's grandmother.
Tom Foster was rather small for his age and had a large head covered with stiff black hair that stood straight up.
One could not help wondering where Tom Foster got his gentleness.
For a year Tom Foster lived in the banker's stable and then lost his place there.
Foster was within earshot; she knew exactly what to do with him if anything happened.
Foster prepared for his uncle the medicine which was to give him an easy night.
Smith's intense ter- ror; Amy Foster's stolid conviction held against the other's nervous attack, that the man 'meant no harm'; Smith's exasperation (on his return from Darnford Market) at finding the dog barking himself into a fit, the back-door locked, his wife in hysterics; and all for an unfortunate dirty tramp, supposed to be even then lurking in his stackyard.
Smith was screaming upstairs, where she had locked herself in her bedroom; but Amy Foster sobbed piteously at the kitchen door, wringing her hands and muttering, 'Don't!
These the Romans fostered. Callicrates and other popular leaders became mercenary instruments for inveigling their countrymen.
This hope she still fostered. To let her parents know that she was a deserted wife, dependent, now that she had relieved their necessities, on her own hands for a living, after the ECLAT of a marriage which was to nullify the collapse of the first attempt, would be too much indeed.
Tublat, his foster father, would have told you this much and more.
So often had that snakelike noose settled unexpectedly over Tublat's head, so often had he been jerked ridiculously and painfully from his feet when he was least looking for such an occurrence, that there is little wonder he found scant space in his savage heart for love of his white-skinned foster child, or the inventions thereof.