founder's syndrome


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founder's syndrome

A condition whereby very successful creators of a company gain an exaggerated sense of their own value. In such cases, their conceit can wind up harming the very organization they built from the ground up.
References in periodicals archive ?
It becomes like a founder's syndrome: 'No one can do it better than me, and therefore I can't sell my business.' So the vast majority of advisers defer, defer, defer, because there is no trigger event, nothing pushing them to do it," he says.
"There's always tension in a leadership transition, certainly with board and staff members," he said, adding that Melia's departure had nothing to do with differences in fundraising strategy but rather concern regarding founder's syndrome. "If time has colored that view, that's a shame.
Hehman said this is called "Founder's Syndrome." He did a lot of research about it before he had "the talk" with McDonald.
He also discusses issues in running a non-profit school or organization, such as moving beyond founder's syndrome, and gives tips on developing new programs and working with a board of directors.
There is a name for this: Founder's Syndrome. So, when we want to begin the conversation on succession planning, we need to talk about Founder's Syndrome as a potential barrier to success.
The very members who did so much to help build your organization may now be entrenched in "founder's syndrome" and will try to organize a full resistance to change.
He is the author of "Moving Beyond Founder's Syndrome to Nonprofit Success" (2008; BoardSource).
Founder's Syndrome usually occurs when a founder is unwilling to step aside to make a clean break from the organization and the belief that only that person knows what's best for the nonprofit, according to Linda Crompton, president and CEO of BoardSource, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that publishes guidelines and policies about nonprofit governance and management.
Crompton's prescription to avoid Founder's Syndrome is to have the founder step back for a year and not serve on the organization's board." There's no uncertainty around what's good practice; it's not a good practice for the founder to remain on the board," said Crompton.
Jordan said the topic of founder's syndrome was a matter of open discussion among the board.
The term "Founder's Syndrome" rolls off the tongue for many people, a casual phrase used to describe all kinds of negative situations involving the person who started a nonprofit.