fovea

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fovea

[′fō·vē·ə]
(biology)
A small depression or pit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the finding of no difference in full foveal thicknesses between drug users and nonusers, a negative and significant correlation was present between the thickness of these structures and the dose of drug per kilogram of body weight.
Appendix Steven's Exponents, for a Sample of Studies With Foveal Viewing, Luminance Ranges, and Target Sizes Similar to the Present Experiments Source Target Size [beta] (degrees visual angle) Barlow & Verrillo, 1976 2.
Object identification occurs when the object is within the foveal area of the person's field of vision, but the fovea consists mostly of cones, which do not function in low-light situations.
The emphasis on foveal vision is known as cortical magnification or M-scaling, (9-10) a concept that is demonstrated in Figure 1, where a physically small area of retina (the fovea) is represented on a much greater scale within the primary visual cortex.
Foveal versus eccentric retinal critical flicker frequency in mild traumatic brain injury.
The colouration of the female is pale with a contrasting pattern (transverse bands on abdomen and characteristic tear-shaped spots in the foveal area), consistent with other Brancus (see Wesolowska & Russell-Smith 2011 and Wesolowska & Edwards 2012).
The fovea was classified as being functioning if the anatomical foveal area of approximately 2 degrees was not a dense scotoma and the area could maintain a steady stimulus and follow a moving 30,000-Troland stimulus.
Panchuk and Vickers (2009) suggested that determining the extent to which participants picked-up peripheral target information was not possible because the eye-tracking technology is limited to measuring foveal vision.
The human visual system can be quite insensitive to large luminance differences in the total FOV, but it is very sensitive to small luminance differences in the foveal region.
The 25 patients receiving daily zeaxanthin supplementation not only showed an increased concentration in their macular pigment, but also saw a statistically significant improvement in foveal shape discrimination and their kinetic visual field under low contrast.
A small contribution to the head comes from the foveal artery via the ligamentum teres.
The investigators defined early ARM as the presence of indistinct soft drusen, reticular drusen, or concurrent distinct soft drusen and retinal pigmentary abnormalities, while late ARM was defined as neovascular ARM or generalized atrophy involving the foveal center.