foxglove


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foxglove:

see figwortfigwort,
common name for some members of the Scrophulariaceae, a family comprising chiefly herbs and small shrubs and distributed widely over all continents. The family includes a few climbing types and some parasitic and saprophytic forms.
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foxglove

any Eurasian scrophulariaceous plant of the genus Digitalis, esp D. purpurea, having spikes of purple or white thimble-like flowers. The soft wrinkled leaves are a source of digitalis
References in periodicals archive ?
I had a great show of foxgloves this year and have been shaking the seeds from the spent flowerheads around the garden to spread "the magic".
Finally remember foxgloves are poisonous and even handling them without gloves may irritate skin.
At Foxglove, the customer becomes a character in a movie," says Chow, "stepping out of the real world for the few hours they're inside.
But the display is likely to be short-lived with foxgloves fading by the end of June.
Blooms in colors from apricot to magenta top a mound of velvety leaves that are less prone to rust than standard foxglove.
Since the 13th century, the herb and poisonous plant Foxglove has been used to cleanse wounds and its dried leaves were carefully brewed by Native Americans to treat leg swelling caused by heart problems.
Fuchs first applied the term digitus to the foxglove in his herbal De Historia Stirpium, published in 1542.
She spotted a rogue pink foxglove in her border the other day and pulled it out in disgust.
If you're a foxglove fanatic like me, you can live with this problem.
Woodlanders, an attractive mix of traditional foxglove varieties.
The foxglove (Digitalis spp) is a truly medicinal herb and not one that you would ever administer to yourself.
In Japan, the virus relies on the foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani, to find soybean host plants.