foxglove


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foxglove:

see figwortfigwort,
common name for some members of the Scrophulariaceae, a family comprising chiefly herbs and small shrubs and distributed widely over all continents. The family includes a few climbing types and some parasitic and saprophytic forms.
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foxglove

any Eurasian scrophulariaceous plant of the genus Digitalis, esp D. purpurea, having spikes of purple or white thimble-like flowers. The soft wrinkled leaves are a source of digitalis
References in periodicals archive ?
Foxgloves are this summer's most fashionable flower.
A spokesperson for KPS Pub Co Ltd adds: With The Foxglove we are hoping to inject some passion and integrity into the pub scene based on our appreciation of good quality, independently made alcohol.
Foxgloves are poisonous if eaten, so best avoided if you have pets or young children.
Standing 2 to 3 feet tall, it isn't as tall and showy as common foxglove (Digitalis purpurea), which can reach an impressive height of 4 or 5 feet.
Finally remember foxgloves are poisonous and even handling them without gloves may irritate skin.
In the jewel-box boutique out front, British Fox umbrellas--handmade in Surrey since 1868--are displayed like precious baubles along with little jars of Foxglove perfume, a unisex fragrance by DS and Durga.
From Europe and the Mediterranean, this foxglove forms a basal rosette of woolly leaves that are prone to a disease called rust.
Since the 13th century, the herb and poisonous plant Foxglove has been used to cleanse wounds and its dried leaves were carefully brewed by Native Americans to treat leg swelling caused by heart problems.
"Foxglove" may be a corruption of "folk glove," the "folk" referring to "little folk" or sprites.
If you're a foxglove fanatic like me, you can live with this problem.
ADIGOXIN is an extract of the European foxglove, which was discovered by William Withering, a famous Birmingham physician and botanist.
The foxglove (Digitalis spp) is a truly medicinal herb and not one that you would ever administer to yourself.