foxglove

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foxglove:

see figwortfigwort,
common name for some members of the Scrophulariaceae, a family comprising chiefly herbs and small shrubs and distributed widely over all continents. The family includes a few climbing types and some parasitic and saprophytic forms.
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foxglove

any Eurasian scrophulariaceous plant of the genus Digitalis, esp D. purpurea, having spikes of purple or white thimble-like flowers. The soft wrinkled leaves are a source of digitalis
References in periodicals archive ?
A car was stopped at the end of Foxgloves and it was searched and taken away on a tow truck.
Take foxglove However, with pelargoniums you can let the cutting dry out a bit for a couple of days so that the end of the cutting forms a bit of a callus.
It is thought that there are two Welsh names for the foxglove, one is Ffion, from which the popular Welsh female name is taken and the other is Maneg Ellyllyn which translate as "The Good People's Glove.
The pinkish-purple of the wild foxglove has been improved by gardeners over the years, partly by selection and partly by crossing with other species.
The display of foxgloves in the gardens of Plan Tan y Bwlch in Snowdonia National Park
ATTRACTIVE An artist's impression of the fivebedroom Foxglove townhouse above and, left, a general view of the development
Carol hard at work planting pot grown foxgloves in the woodland garden, above
Foxgloves have a particular association with Birmingham through the work of the 18th century physician and botanist William Withering.
New varieties under the name orchid foxgloves have flower funnels consisting of four tubular petals, curving inwards to give a frilled look.
Because foxgloves grow tall, they are usually planted in groups as a background to a flower border.
She spotted a rogue pink foxglove in her border the other day and pulled it out in disgust.
ADIGOXIN is an extract of the European foxglove, which was discovered by William Withering, a famous Birmingham physician and botanist.