fragment

(redirected from fragmental)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

fragment

[′frag·mənt]
(ordnance)
A piece of an exploding or exploded bomb, projectile, or the like.
To break into fragments.

fragment

fragment

(1) In networking, one piece of a data packet that has been broken into smaller pieces in order to accommodate the maximum transmission unit (MTU) size of a network. See IP fragmentation.

(2) In a disk file system, a part of a file that is located elsewhere on the disk (not contiguous with the rest of the file). See fragmentation.

(3) In computer graphics, a pixel that has been transformed from its original state and is ready to update the frame buffer. See fragment processor.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 min generated fragmental ions at m/z 268, 257, 241, 224 and 211 (Fig.
My approach of fragmental engagement runs counter to traditional ways of attending to notes and scribbles; however, it is my contention that Sade lived in such a manner that he made his life (as well as his writing) a part of his literary output.
The author tries to use social norm theory to integrate the entire volume, but readers may still feel the book is somewhat fragmental.
Each of the fragmental twin churches on the Piazza del Popolo, however, is complete at the level of program but incomplete in the expression of form.
Unfortunately, information on the Baltic autumn spawning herring is relatively fragmental and almost lacking during the past decades.
The Ashfall ash bed does not include all taxa present in this area, as the fragmental zone beneath the ash bed contains over 35 mammalian taxa while the ash bed contains only 12 mammalian taxa (Voorhies, 2006).
In mine geology terminology, the main components of the shear zone are chlorite mottled schist, quartz-sericite (chlorite) schist, bodies of schistose and fragmental andesite, and dacite dykes and sills.
Rather, they seem to conceptually overlap and reinforce one another; the approaches to the firm provide fragmental knowledge that contributes to an Austrian understanding of the firm in the market but do not supply or fully support a universal view or theory.
Although these approaches list many operational details for evaluation, they are organized in a fragmental way, which blurs the distinctive status of budgetary decision-making process.
This proposed stratigraphic relationship supports the interpretation that the tuffaceous and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks of the Priest Cove Formation represent a distal facies of the mafic flows and fragmental volcanic rocks of the Ross Island Formation.
The fragmental nature of these states created the conditions for abuse by local elite and their metropolitan bosses.