fragment

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fragment

[′frag·mənt]
(ordnance)
A piece of an exploding or exploded bomb, projectile, or the like.
To break into fragments.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fragment

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

fragment

(1) In networking, one piece of a data packet that has been broken into smaller pieces in order to accommodate the maximum transmission unit (MTU) size of a network. See IP fragmentation.

(2) In a disk file system, a part of a file that is located elsewhere on the disk (not contiguous with the rest of the file). See fragmentation.

(3) In computer graphics, a pixel that has been transformed from its original state and is ready to update the frame buffer. See fragment processor.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Four fragmentary hominid fossils have also turned up among numerous animal bones excavated since 1982 at the nearby Cueva Victoria dig, he adds.
For her, Sceve, like the other Renaissance authors, wrote "fragmentary, polyphonic, or plurivocal texts [which] emphasize the indeterminacy of truth and meaning, and question the referentiality of language, as well as the significance and signification of sign systems" (9).
Starting with images of landscapes taken from travel brochures or photographs snapped by the artist during her own journeys, Dring transforms these scenes into basic, fragmentary visual data in large pictures.
Other plays by Gager in a similarly neoclassical vein include Rivales, 1583, a comedy on rustic wooing that is now lost except for two prologues and a few fragments; a fragmentary unpublished Oedipus (early 1580s); Dido, 1583, adapted from Virgil and with suggestive hints of analogies to Elizabeth as a chaste queen who is piously fit to govern (though Dido dies as a chaste widow, not a virgin); Ulysses Redux, 1592, a tragicomic retelling of the second half of the Odyssey that focuses on the suitors' unwelcome attempts to win the hand of Penelope; and some added scenes for a production of Seneca's Hippolytus at Christ Church in 1592, restoring some of the divine machinery that Seneca had eliminated in his reworking of Euripides' play.
But the long-standing debate over how best to divvy up fragmentary fossils into hominid species has not vanished.
For decades, artists have explored the visual-cognitive tic that drives viewers to create, in their minds, a fully drawn reality from fragmentary information, as well as photography's complicity in this scheme.
It does include the fourteen Greek tracts first translated into Latin by Marsilio Ficino in 1462-63 (and first published in 1471) and the Latin Asclepius, which was known throughout the Middle Ages but for which no Greek text survives except for fragmentary passages quoted by late classical and patristic authors.
Eosimias, the Chinese animal, remains an evolutionary enigma, based on the fragmentary remains uncovered so far, Gunnell adds.
He covers fragmentary manuscripts of the second and third centuries, extensive manuscripts of the third century, fragmentary manuscripts of the fourth century, and Codex Vaticanus and Codex Sinaiticus--fourth-century manuscripts with the complete text of the Synoptic Gospels.
Couplets, prose poems, letters, a series of imagined postcards: these are a few of the shapes in which Korean-born professor and poet Jennifer Kwon Dobbs embeds the fragmentary images of her verse.
The objects include: | a hoard of three fragmentary Bronze Age socketed axes found in Kidwelly Community, Carmarthenshire; | a hoard of 105 Roman coins found in Angle Community, Pembrokeshire; | a fragmentary Viking silver arm ring found in Jeffreyston Community, Pembrokeshire; | a medieval silver seal matrix found near St Dogmael's, Pembrokeshire; | a 16th-century silver decorative gilt ring found in Manorbier Community, Pembrokeshire; and | a post-medieval silver scabbard chape found in Camrose Community, Pembrokeshire.