franklinite


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franklinite

[′fraŋ·klə‚nīt]
(mineralogy)
ZnFe2O4 Black, slightly magnetic mineral member of the spinel group; usually possesses extensive substitution of divalent manganese and iron for the divalent zinc, and limited trivalent manganese for the trivalent iron.
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Confused, the Chickamauga were unable to mount an organized resistance except for an attack on the Franklinite artillery position, which proved to be effective and resulted in the killing of the gun crew.
The Franklinite casualties were five dead and 16 wounded.
It was also during a time of year when Franklinite men typically stayed tethered to their homesteads rather than campaigning.
As the initial assault began, the surprised Chickamauga were unable to react in-depth, barring the destruction of the Franklinite cannon.
In East Tennessee, the conclusion of' the 18th century was marked by a violent struggle between the European-descended Franklinites and the Chickamauga, IED by a cadre of Cherokee, Creek, and Shawnee war captains Generally labeled the Chickamauga Wars, the conflict spanned approximately two decades and resulted in a multitude of campaigns, battles, and skirmishes with much blood and treasure lost on both sides.
From this attack position, the Franklinites were able to identify the exact location of the camp by the smoke from its fires.
the great difficulty of smelting usable iron from the franklinite which constituted the bulk of the Franklin ores--but zinc was taken easily enough from the same ores, and now zinc had a major industrial use, and so the mines' economic importance was assured.
In 1857 the first lawsuits of "The Great Franklinite Case" were filed, with five mining companies quarreling over mining rights, claim boundaries, and even the definition of "ore" and "ore mineral.
A brief comparison of the Franklinites with the Green Mountain Boys or Pennsylvania's Wyoming Valley insurgents would have enhanced the significance of Barksdale's book as a study in post-Revolutionary governance.