exercise

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exercise:

see physical fitnessphysical fitness,
combined good health and physical development. The object of any program of physical fitness is to maximize an individual's health, strength, endurance, and skill relative to age, sex, body build, and physiology.
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exercise

1. US and Canadian a ceremony or formal routine, esp at a school or college
2. Gymnastics a particular type of event, such as performing on the horizontal bar
References in periodicals archive ?
(35) Under RFRA, whenever state action results in a substantial burden on the free exercise of religion, the state must show that its action is in furtherance of a compelling interest, and that it used the least restrictive means of furthering that interest, even where the substantial burden resulted from a neutral law of general applicability.
(41) Regarding institutionalized persons, (42) RLUIPA was enacted to expand the free exercise rights of prisoners and other persons residing in government-run facilities by creating a legal standard that affords less deference to institutional administrators than the Turner standard.
In this paper, I argue that while both of these methods offer valuable jurisprudence, the American system's characterization results in a stronger judicial basis of support for free exercise claims.
The structure of this note is as follows: first, I explain the evolution of the United States' system of protection for free exercise, as well as its current status.
It focuses on the provisos to the state free exercise guarantees to advance a two-step argument against Justice Scalia's historical argument for Smith.
Dozens have attended the free exercise sessions and organisers are hoping local people will volunteer to assist with or lead the classes.
'The free exercise and enjoyment of religious profession and worship, without discrimination or preference, shall forever be allowed.
Citing a provision under the Bill of Rights of the 1987 Constitution, Fox stressed that 'no law shall be made respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.'
She covers the free exercise of religion; introduction to establishment; what an established religion is; constitutional and statutory protection of free exercise; conscience, complicity, and conscientious objection; conflicts between individual and institutional religious freedom; the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act; comparative religious freedom; religion and politics; teaching about religion and science; and the old and new law of religion.
Across the country, individuals, religious schools, and corporations have sued to enjoin the mandate, arguing, among other things, that it violates the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act ("RFRA").
This article compares the constitutional protections afforded the free exercise of religion in the United States and Japan.