free quark


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free quark

[′frē ′kwärk]
(particle physics)
A hypothetical quark that is not bound together with other quarks within a hadron, and whose charge, mass, and other properties can therefore be measured individually.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the physical description of the process of decay of the quark top (t) to two bodies, the quark model or free quark model will be used, in which the active quark of the meson decays independently of the other constituents of the particle as shown in the Figure 1.
Consequently, calculation of [^.[GAMMA].sub.s.sup.npW], [M.sub.2[gamma]s] descends to evaluation of the transition matrix elements between the neutron |[[PHI].sub.n.sup.q] ([P.sub.n], [[sigma].sub.n])> and proton <[[PHI].sub.p.sup.q] ([P.sub.p], [[sigma].sub.p])| states of the expressions given in terms of free quark operators:
According to Rockenbauer, measurements should have given eigenvalues of the charge operator and since that did not happen, no fractional charge could be detected excluding the possibility of observation of free quarks.
Objective: Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) is a primordial state of matter, which consists of interacting free quarks and gluons.
This action is divergent, but the divergences can be avoided by subtracting the inertial mass of two free quarks, given by
It is the free quarks and gluons situation; [[alpha].sub.s] [right arrow] 0 occurs at high energy for the free quarks phase.
Theory holds that for a brief time at the beginning of the universe there were no protons and neutrons, only free quarks and gluons.
The result was surprising, since theorists had expected the matter to behave like a gas of free quarks and gluons (a plasma).
Free quarks roamed a thick broth of gluons, particles that carry the strong force.
But free quarks in spacetime do not exist because they are confined according to QCD, forming the colorless quark-antiquark, three-quark, or three-antiquark combinations called hadrons.
This soup of free quarks (particles that make up protons and neutrons) and gluons (particles that transmit the strong nuclear force) existed in nature for only a few millionths of a second after the Big Bang.