free recoil


Also found in: Wikipedia.

free recoil

[¦frē ′rē‚kȯil]
(ordnance)
The movement in recoil of the recoiling parts of a gun, if unimpeded by resistances such as springs or pneumatic pressure; it is a theoretical term used in recoil mechanism design.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
If you calculate the free recoil of the Ethos 28 firing Federal 3/4-ounce loads at 1,230 feet per second (fps), it's coming back at you with 20.
Unless it's a rimfire scope, obviously not meant for general use, I typically mount test scopes on very accurate rifles generating at least 30 foot-pounds of free recoil, typical of a .
577 Tyrannosaur possesses the heaviest free recoil of all commercially available, shoulder-fired dangerous game rifles - 220lbs into the shoulder.
The free recoil energy calculations exceed many high powered rifles and hover in the same neighborhood as the .
That said, most hunters find that a rifle/cartridge combination producing a free recoil energy of more than 25 to 30 pounds is uncomfortable to shoot.
So while zero doesn't change much, recoil surely does, and as an exercise I calculated the free recoil energy for the three in my rifle.
of free recoil energy from a pistol that only weighs 22 ozs.
Calculated free recoil energy in foot pounds showed that the Desert Eagle, despite its giving higher velocity with identical loads--due to the integral chamber/barrel configuration--had a significant loss in recoil over a conventional--albeit lighter--revolver.
I should hasten to point out that the calculation of free recoil is not what you and I would get (that is felt recoil for which there is no calculation) but rather how much recoil the gun would have if it were fired suspended with no restrictions.
The free recoil energy of the 8-1/2-pound rifle would be 16.