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free

1. (of a country, etc.) autonomous or independent
2. (of jazz) totally improvised, with no preset melodic, harmonic, or rhythmic basis
3. Law of property
a. not subject to payment of rent or performance of services; freehold
b. not subject to any burden or charge, such as a mortgage or lien; unencumbered
4. Chem chemically uncombined
5. Logic denoting an occurrence of a variable not bound by a quantifier
6. Nautical (of the wind) blowing from the quarter

free

References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, the US has strict constitutional protections of the right to free speech. But this noble aim has been abused in a most appalling way, such as the protests at the funerals of military personnel by the Westboro Baptist Church in which they "thank God for dead soldiers" or the foul lie by Alex Jones, of far-right conspiracy theory website Infowars, that the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook primary school, in which 20 young children and six adults were killed, did not happen and was invented by gun control advocates.
However, Levant persisted and accused the Minister of adopting double standards on free speech. 'You have double standards what you call freedom; at times you are projecting certain agendas,' Qureshi responded.
The early attempts to suppress free speech were signed into law by President John Adams and became known as the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798.
Pakistan is letting free speech die, and remarkably, has massive support for it.
supplanted by the view that free speech was intrinsically valuable for
They talk about free speech, I can't say that thing, there is no free speech.
Under the order, the schools will themselves certify whether they are protecting students' free speech rights, which are already guaranteed by the U.S.
As many of the recent editorials in this very magazine argue this line, I thought it pertinent to reflect upon Humanism's long commitments to free speech and how that can inform the debates that seem to dominate the current discourse.
A city ordinance that intends to control the destructive force of profane expressions has nothing to do with 'backwardness,' ('Don't kill free speech,' Letters, 11/15/18).
According to a Pew Research Center study conducted in 2015, Americans are at the top of the list who tolerate free speech as long as it does not violate their national interests.
Delgado and Stefancic instead call for a system of free speech that takes into account the harms that hate speech can inflict upon disempowered, marginalized people.