free-electron laser


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free-electron laser

[′frē i¦lek‚trän ′lā·zər]
(optics)
A device in which a beam of relativistic electrons passes through a static periodic magnetic field to amplify a superimposed coherent optical wave and thereby produce a powerful beam of coherent light.
References in periodicals archive ?
They conclude with the possibilities opened up by the X-ray free-electron laser, due to its extremely short and intense X-ray pulses, and a description of its operating principle.
Nagamine et al., "Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-angstram wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser," Nature, vol.
Figuring out how this tiny machine works at the molecular level was enormously facilitated by our use of one of the brightest X-ray sources on Earth, the X-ray free-electron laser at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.
Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based radiation sources have evident advantages in wavelength tunability, high efficiency and high output power, compared to current LPP radiation sources.
(3) SACLA X-ray free-electron laser: Japan's first XFEL facility constructed by RIKEN.
"A state-of-the-art, free-electron laser for X-ray diffraction can be the size of a football field," says Ray Gao, a PhD candidate in physics at the University of Toronto.
Washington, December 22 ( ANI ): Using the world's most powerful X-ray free-electron laser, an international team of researchers has obtained new insight into the structure of a medicinally important protein that may serve as a blueprint for the development of drugs to fight sleeping sickness.
Tipton-based Midland Tool and Design is producing the components for The Paul Scherrer Institute's SwissFEL (Free-Electron Laser) facility, designed to create intense, short flashes of x-ray light and fire them at extremely high speeds along a 700m tunnel.
Midland Tool and Design is producing the components for The Paul Scherrer Institute's SwissFEL (Free-Electron Laser) facility, which is designed to create intense, short flashes of x-ray light and fire them at extremely high speeds along a 700m tunnel.