rapid manufacturing

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rapid manufacturing

Building parts out of plastic or metal one layer at a time using a method of additive fabrication such as 3D printing. Multiple pieces, either similar or dissimilar, can be built simultaneously. Rapid manufacturing evolved from some of the technologies used to build prototypes (see rapid prototyping). See 3D printing.
References in periodicals archive ?
While LS is one of the most popular 3D printing processes for freeform fabrication, engineers still struggle with designing for the anisotropic process.
(2010), "Evaluating cell proliferation based o n internal pore size and 3D scaffold architecture fabricated using solid freeform fabrication technology", J Mater Sci: Mater Med, Vol 21, pp.3195-3205.
The Fused Deposition Modeling for instance (patented by the company Stratasys) and the Freeform Fabrication, are common 3D printing techniques used in most entry level printers where plastic filament is melted and deposited through a heated extruder one layer at a time.
The name that we used to describe the 3D Printing technology is Solid Freeform Fabrication. We defined Solid Freeform Fabrication as the ability to fabricate complex solid objects from a computer model of an object without part-specific tooling or human intervention.
Additive Manufacturing (AM) as it is now called according to ASTM International [1] is also referred to as rapid prototyping, additive fabrication, freeform fabrication, 3D printing, and rapid manufacturing; and uses advanced technologies to fabricate parts by joining and building up material layer-by-layer.
The Ford Freeform Fabrication Technology (F3T) uses counterpoised robots to enable two styli to work simultaneously on both surfaces of a sheet of metal to produce a required shape.
Luo, International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium--An Additive Manufacturing Conference, Austin, TX, USA (2010).
Also known as rapid prototyping, layer manufacturing, and solid freeform fabrication, the technology involves additive layer-by-layer fabrication of a three-dimensional, biologically relevant structure through selective joining of material using the computer-aided design model.
Government and industry leaders will discuss the future and possibilities of electron beam freeform fabrication or EBF3, which can be used to make components for aviation, spaceflight, or even the medical industry.
The experiment included structures made by leaching and foaming processes (resulting in microscopic structures looking like clumps of insect-eaten lettuce), freeform fabrication (like microscopic rods stacked in a crisscross pattern) and electrospun nanofibers (a random nest of thin fibers).