freestone


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freestone

[′frē‚stōn]
(botany)
A fruit stone to which the fruit does not cling, as in certain varieties of peach.
(geology)
Stone, particularly a thick-bedded, even-textured, fine-grained sandstone, that breaks freely and is able to be cut and dressed with equal facility in any direction without tending to split.

freestone

Fairly fine-grained stone that works easily; has no tendency to split in any preferential direction; esp. suitable for carving and elaborate milling; usually a sandstone or a granular limestone.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the arrest, Parker was sent to Freestone County Jail.
Freestone Capital Management is a Northwest-based wealth management firm that brings together superior client service within all aspects of wealth management and a comprehensive investment approach for clients who entrust the firm to help them achieve their long-term financial goals.
Single mother Ms Freestone is now backing the Change The Law For Life campaign calling for an optout system for organ donation.
The transaction is expected to be non-taxable to Freestone's and Dynamis' shareholders.
"It was very quiet in that changing room," says Freestone, now 45, reflecting on a memory from 19 years ago as though it was yesterday.
Freestone first joined Swansea on loan from Chelsea in 1989 and the last match of his initial stay was against Cardiff at home.
While acknowledging the dark old days, Freestone is now keen to focus on the incredible progress his beloved Swans have made in recent seasons.
Swansea boss Brian Flynn said: "Freestone's error was the sort of thing that TV viewers might see on 'What Happened Next'.
EVERGREEN goalkeeper Roger Freestone is set for his 13th year with Swansea after signing a new 12-month deal yesterday.
One of the earliest Scouts was George Freestone, who joined that year in Los Angeles at age 12.
IN-FORM striker Chris Freestone netted a late double as Rugby cruised to victory at a blustery Butlin Road.
"The residues of dioxin left over in the ash were below the lowest amounts our analytical equipment can detect, which is two tenths of a part per billion," Frank Freestone, the EPA's project manager at the Missouri test site, said in a telephone interview this week.