freewheel

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freewheel

1. a ratchet device in the rear hub of a bicycle wheel that permits the wheel to rotate freely while the pedals are stationary
2. a device in the transmission of some vehicles that automatically disengages the drive shaft when it rotates more rapidly than the engine shaft, so that the drive shaft can turn freely
References in periodicals archive ?
Luckily, with Freewheeling he's got a series of his own, and this week he's using it find out what else his Twitter followers would like to see more of, and then attempt to make it a reality.
ur to an He tweeted: "I am filming Freewheeling at the moment, your involvement is needed.
Besides not requiring any energy, the freewheeling retarder also provides higher braking power, 4,100 Nm instead of 3,500 Nm, as well as an increased braking effect at lower engine rpm with the help of higher gear ratios.
Kwik-Fit research found 15 per cent of motorists are now freewheeling but customer services chief David White said: "The dangers make it a money-saving step too far.
At its heart, the debate is about whether the Internet needs protection to preserve its character as a freewheeling, spontaneous forum.
Kolb paints a colorful story of his life as a freewheeling and audacious adventurer.
In any case, the open, even freewheeling style in which PERFORMA05 was curated seems to hold true to an old-school downtown spirit.
Members of the Huddersfield branch of the Cyclists Touring Club take a break from the freewheeling contest that was held at The Strines at Langsett in 1966.
When the researchers compared these results with rates of female promiscuity, they found a strong correlation: The more freewheeling a species' females, the faster SEMG2 evolved.
and the rise of conservative politics, freewheeling financial speculation, global mobility of capital, and exploitation of Third World labor.
From the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, Latin American filmmakers offered up ferocious, tough-minded, tender and aesthetically freewheeling films about death (in the enervating and utterly captivating Los muertos from Argentina), loss of innocence (in the Louis Malle-esque tale of boyhood friendship set during the coup in 1973 Chile in Machuca), dreams of freedom (in the talented young Brazilian director Jorge Furtado's latest, The Man Who Counted), the peculiarities of human relationship (in the International Critics Prize-winning Whisky, the second feature by the Uruguayan directorial team of Juan-Pablo Rebella and Pablo Stoll) and the absurdities of adolescence (in the wry Mexican feature that is one part Jim Jarmusch, one part Carlos Carrera, Duck Season).
Monica Chojnacka's solid book shifts the focus from the freewheeling and sexually aggressive young nobles of the Contarini and Dandolo lineages, well known from other works, to the female underclass that so often fell victim to their predatory ways.