VF

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Related to fremitus: vocal fremitus, tactile fremitus

VF

(communications)

VF

The flap-limiting speed. The maximum speed for flight with the flaps extended. Now replaced by VFE.
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0.0007 0.4798 0.0007 Phanerodon furcatus 0.1716 0.1071 0.0313 Cvmatogaster aggregata 0.1005 0.6411 0.0001 KGB YOY (1) 0.0038 0.0341 0.0006 Brachvistius fremitus 0.3762 0.1600 0.4938 Sebastes miniatus YOY 0.0916 0.0001 0.0001 Embiotoca jacksoni 0.0033 0.0916 0.0162 Aulorhynchus flavidus 0.4649 0.3638 0.4685 Hvpsurus carvi 0.4824 0.0381 0.0037 Damalichthvs vacca 0.0573 0.1179 0.4520 Sebastes caurinus 0.4054 0.3437 0.3529 Sebastes paitcispinis YOY 0.1283 0.4334 0.0667 Sebastes 0.3805 0.2238 0.0121 serranoidestSebastes flavidus YOY Heterostiehus rostratus 0.0318 0.2473 0.0162 Cable B HAxIN HAxDA INxDA Fish community 0.0127 0.5245 0.1356 Taxon: Oxvjulis californica 0.0144 0.8534 0.7389 Citharichthys spp.
Percussion note was dull with increased vocal fremitus. There was no air entry in the left lung.
It is similar to tactile fremitus, where consolidation is noted by the vibratory feel in your hand placed on the chest of a patient.
Physical findings may include the following: tachycardia, tachypnea, and diminished breath sounds, hyperresonance to percussion, and decreased tactile fremitus on the ipsilateral side.
Classic signs during physical examination are diminished breath sounds, dullness to the percussion, decrease tactile fremitus, and localized pleural friction rub.
Tactile fremitus was absent on the right side with ipsilateral diminution of breath sounds and dullness to percussion.
Examination was remarkable for increased tactile vocal fremitus on left lung with bronchial breath sounds and egophony.
A pulmonary examination revealed increased tactile fremitus, dullness to percussion, and decreased breath sounds at the right pulmonary base.
Asymmetric breath sounds, increased fremitus, and pleural rubs are very specific for the presence of consolidation, but are often absent clinically.
In the "vocal fremitus" method which is a medical examination method used for examination of the lungs, as the patient repeates a simple word which would produce a sound of "n" from the nasal passage, the physician puts his/her hands on the back of the patient, feels the vibration with his/her hands and makes the necessary evaluation.
Rales may be heard throughout inspiration, and dullness to percussion and decreased fremitus may indicate a pleural effusion.
Respiratory system examination showed a decreased expansion in the upper chest while vocal fremitus was increased and the percussion note dull in the right upper chest.