hertz

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hertz

(hûrts) [for Heinrich R. HertzHertz, Heinrich Rudolf
, 1857–94, German physicist. He confirmed J. C. Maxwell's electromagnetic theory and in the course of experiments (1886–89) produced and studied electromagnetic waves (known also as hertzian waves, or radio waves).
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], abbr. Hz, unit of frequency, equal to 1 cycle per second. The term is combined with metric prefixes to denote multiple units such as the kilohertz (1,000 Hz), megahertz (1,000,000 Hz), and gigahertz (1,000,000,000 Hz).

hertz

(herts) Symbol: Hz. The SI unit of frequency, defined as the frequency of a periodic phenomenon that has a period of one second. The frequency range of electromagnetic radiation is about 3000 Hz (very low frequency radio waves) to about 1022 Hz (high-frequency gamma rays).

hertz

[hərts]
(physics)
Unit of frequency; a periodic oscillation has a frequency of n hertz if in 1 second it goes through n cycles. Also known as cycle per second (cps). Symbolized Hz.

hertz

A unit of frequency, abbr. Hz; one cycle per second.

hertz

hertz
The frequency of any cyclic repetition. One hertz (Hz) is one cycle per second. The number of cycles per second is expressed in hertz. Kilohertz (kHz) is a frequency of one thousand cycles per second. Megahertz (MHz) is a frequency of one million cycles per second. The term is named after Heinrich Hertz, a German physicist (1857–1894). Also called a cycle.

hertz

the derived SI unit of frequency; the frequency of a periodic phenomenon that has a periodic time of 1 second; 1 cycle per second.

Hertz

1. Gustav . 1887--1975, German atomic physicist. He provided evidence for the quantum theory by his research with Franck on the effects produced by bombarding atoms with electrons: they shared the Nobel prize for physics (1925)
2. Heinrich Rudolph . 1857--94, German physicist. He was the first to produce electromagnetic waves artificially

Hertz

Abbreviated "Hz," one Hertz is equal to one cycle per second. In 1883, Heinrich Hertz detected electromagnetic waves, and his name was adopted to measure the number of electromagnetic waves, or cycles, in a signal. Hertz is widely used to refer to the clock rate of a CPU; for example, 2 GHz means two billion cycles per second. The term is also used for other repeating cycles such as frame rate; for example, a 60 Hz TV displays 60 frames per second. See MHz, GHz and space/time.
References in periodicals archive ?
This indicates that there is a reduction in the frequency of light when the source or emitter is nearer the body than the receiver.
The device--created by a team at the National Institute of Scientific Research (INRS) in Montreal and described in Optica--uses a new approach to invisibility cloaking in which the frequency of light passing through an object is manipulated.
Then, they measured the frequency of light absorbed by some 15,000 antihydrogen atoms as they move from a low to a high-energy state.
When light strikes an object and a specific frequency becomes absorbed, that frequency of light will never come to our eyes.
Unlike the slits in a diffraction grating, however, the silicon bars were extremely efficient and readily reflected the frequency of light they were tuned to.
To do this, they measured the frequency of light needed to change an electron's energy in a particular way in a molecule called CH, which is composed of one carbon atom and one hydrogen atom.
We know that visual and auditory stimuli can be quantified by the intensity and frequency of light and sound, but we don't fully understand the mechanics that generate our sense of touch," she said.
is the wave number; m is the frequency of light; [[epsilon].sub.0] is the dielectric respond of optical medium created by electron dipoles [10]
The optical molasses method makes use of the Doppler effect-- the change in the observed frequency of light due to relative motion of the source and observer.
The larger the energy difference between the two levels, the higher the frequency of light emitted.
It describes how the frequency of light waves (or the pitch of sound waves) emitted by a moving object becomes higher as the object approaches an observer and lower as it moves away.
But in the new study the metamaterial aperture allowed fine control over the frequency of light. Only light of a certain frequency can get through a particular etched section of the metamaterial screen.

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