frequency-dependent selection


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frequency-dependent selection

[¦frē·kwən·sē di¦pen·dənt si′lek·shən]
(evolution)
A type of natural selection that decreases the frequency of more common phenotypes in a population and increases the frequency of less common phenotypes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In evolutionary terms, sex ratio evolution is a classic example of negative frequency-dependent selection.
Keywords: Alces alces, antlers, frequency-dependent selection, moose, phenotypic change, selection plateau, social stress
Clarke (1969) and others (reviewed in Allen 1988) have argued that frequency-dependent selection on color morphs as a result of differential predation (apostatic selection) is responsible for the maintenance of many visible polymorphisms.
Chemical agents, which are behaviorally and evolutionarily static, may be less likely to induce frequency-dependent selection on target pests than arise from biocontrol agents, which may be behaviorally plastic and also have their own evolutionary dynamics.
However, this is not necessarily the case: frequency-dependent selection involving the ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) locus in laboratory populations of D.
Frequency-dependent selection has received wide attention from evolutionary biologists.
The chapters include life-history evolution, foraging theory, frequency-dependent selection, evolutionary game theory, kin selection, sex ratio theory, sexual selection (in 14 pages!), and the evolution of sex.
Frequency-dependent selection, disruptive selection, and the evolution of reproductive isolation.
In addition, Jaenike (1996) proposes that polymorphism may be maintained by frequency-dependent selection, if distorting males are more rapidly sperm depleted than standard males in multiple matings.
At least one polymorphism was stably maintained by frequency-dependent selection via a cross-feeding interaction (Turner et al.
434-580), and deals with density-dependent and frequency-dependent selection and selection on host-pathogen relations.
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