friction ridge

friction ridge

[′frik·shən ‚rij]
(anatomy)
One of the integumentary ridges on the plantar and palmar surfaces of primates.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Friction ridge (or "latent print" or "fingerprint") analysis concerns the comparison of impressions of friction ridge skin--the corrugated skin on the fingers, palms, and soles--in order to make inferences about whether such impressions may have derived from a common source area of friction ridge skin.
In India, there are references to the nobility using friction ridge skin as signatures.
Hands are surrogates and metonyms, extremities that preserve in bronze the friction ridge on a fingertip; an odd, talon-like nail; or plump pockets of skin elsewhere giving way to bone.
It's the "friction ridge skin" or "ridge characteristics" on the ends of a person's fingers and thumbs, palms of their hands and soles of their feet that make these prints -- apparently -- unique.
Focusing on the fundamental aspects of fingerprinting for personal identification and criminal investigation, this text addresses the visualization, detection, and recording of friction ridge skin impressions and the issues involved in the identification and individualization of unknown marks when compared with known prints.
The fingerprint friction ridge matchA[degrees] ing has three levels of security, providing higher protection.
The section then moves into discussion of fingerprints in blood, vacuum metal deposition, the cyanoacrylate fuming method, ninhydrin and ninhydrin analogues, nanoparticles, friction ridge detection, statistics and probability, and digital imaging.
For example, how much of the friction ridge pattern is required for an association of a fingerprint to an individual?
* Standards for the sufficiency of friction ridge impressions for individualization.
Additionally, trace evidence such as explosives, drugs, and fibers has been identified from within the friction ridge deposits.
Her contention that friction ridge identification has "not been sufficiently tested according to the tenets of science" raises this question: To what degree should these undefined "tenets of science" determine the evidentiary value of fingerprints?