froghopper

(redirected from froghoppers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

froghopper

or

spittlebug,

small, hopping insectinsect,
invertebrate animal of the class Insecta of the phylum Arthropoda. Like other arthropods, an insect has a hard outer covering, or exoskeleton, a segmented body, and jointed legs. Adult insects typically have wings and are the only flying invertebrates.
..... Click the link for more information.
 of the order Homoptera. The adult, under 1-2 in. (1.2 cm) long in most species, is triangular in shape and usually gray or dull green to brown. Most froghoppers feed on plants and shrubs; a few feed on trees. They leap from plant to plant, seldom flying. Females insert their eggs in plant stems and sometimes cover them with a protective frothy material. When the nymphs, or larvae, emerge, they feed on the surface of the stem, sucking the plant juices. In many species the nymphs envelop themselves in a mass of foam (called spittle, frog spit, or cuckoo spit) made by blowing air through a viscid fluid expelled from the anus. The spittle, often conspicuous on grasses, protects the enclosed nymphs from desiccation and probably also from predators. Some froghopper species are injurious to pine trees and garden plants. Froghoppers are classified in the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Insecta, order Homoptera, family Cercopidae.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Adult froghoppers can jump high and far, many times their height and length.
This is the earliest record of copulating insects to date, and suggests that froghoppers' genital symmetry and mating position have remained static for over 165 million years.
They're responsible for the "cuckoo-spit" we all notice clinging to flower stems from the shoreline to gardens - step forward the Common Froghopper!
Researchers at Cambridge University recently discovered that a common garden pest, the froghopper (Philaenus spumarius), can propel its tiny 6-millimeter body over half meter (2 feet) into the air.
Carefully wipe away the foam and you'll find the real culprit: a plump, dark-eyed, green creature about the size of a sesame seed -- a froghopper nymph.
AIT SOUNDS like "cuckoo spit", frothy deposits which harbour the young stage of a pest known as a froghopper.
Further information about the survey and froghoppers can be found at: www.xylemfeedinginsects.co.uk I hasten to add that Xylella is not present in the UK.
The temperature conditions (26[degrees]C-30[degrees]C) and high humidity (80% RH) favor the development of froghoppers in the field.
They have revealed that the same strategy of storing up energy from the muscles to produce fast movements is employed by locusts, trap-jaw ants and froghoppers.
The leafhoppers and froghoppers of Australia and New Zealand (Homoptera: Cicadelloidea and Cercopoidea).
Washington, November 16 (ANI): University of Cambridge researchers have found that froghoppers use archery techniques to achieve the jump of 700 mm, more than 100 times their own body length.