frost heave


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frost heave

The raising of a soil surface due to the accumulation of ice in the underlying soil.
References in periodicals archive ?
To sum up, the combination of some factors and levels of coarse-grained soil also produces certain frost heave. The factors affecting the frost heave of coarse-grained soil include the following aspects: the gradation of soil particles, the content of fine particles and their mineral composition, water content, density, permeability coefficient, capillary action, and external load [35-37].
And the author will consider the pore size distribution change caused by frost heave and salt expansion during freezing and verify its validity through the experiment.
Frost heave results from ice forming beneath the surface of soil during freezing conditions in the atmosphere.
More water is drawn to that location to replace the liquid water that was removed due to a concentration gradient and, according to Penner, "pressure is developed so that the ice and soil above it are lifted." How high can frost heave lift the soil?
It appears that quite large initial settlements before freezing, and there is frost heave deformation of 4mm when the temperature descends, but the total settlement is 3-4mm at last.
One phenomenon, called frost heave, is the expansion that occurs when wet, fine-grained soils freeze.
Frost heave damage is also reduced because calcium chloride lowers the freeze point of capillary water in road base materials.
In cold weather areas with high snowfall, frost heave, a condition in which soil with a high-moisture content expands as water freezes, must be considered when determining design requirements and selecting foundation depths for signage.
Heat is reclaimed from the refrigeration system and used to heat the propylene glycol solution, which is circulated through the under-slab piping grid, thus eliminating potential frost heave.
Matters addressed include thermal conductivity and diffusivity; the various theories on frost heave; the effects of thawing such as settlement, consolidation, residual stress and weakening; and the changes which occur after freezing and thawing.
The method prevents frost heave, according to NAHB, even where footings are only 4 inches below grade.