froth

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froth

a mixture of saliva and air bubbles formed at the lips in certain diseases, such as rabies
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

froth

[frȯth]
(chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The runner passed them a dozen feet away, crossed the wet sand, never parsing, till the froth wash was to his knees while above him, ten feet at least, upreared a was of overtopping water.
There was also a goodly jug of well-browned clay, fashioned into the form of an old gentleman, not by any means unlike the locksmith, atop of whose bald head was a fine white froth answering to his wig, indicative, beyond dispute, of sparkling home-brewed ale.
"Give him a great draught of brandy," said the outlaw, "or he will sink down and choke in the froth of his own terror."
- the women with their bare shoulders and jewels, bathed in the soft glow of the rose-shaded electric lights, the piles of beautiful pink and white flowers, the gleaming silver, and the wine which frothed in their glasses.
But not even Uncle Blair's sympathy could take the sting out of the fact that there was no Paddy to get the froth that night at milking time.
Cilliers, "Simple relationships for predicting the recovery of liquid from flowing foams and froths," Minerals Engineering, vol.
Using a unique patented frothing disk, the unit froths automatically with a quick touch of a button, creating foamed or steamed milk with perfect consistency.
It does so with a large external milk carafe with a built-in cappuccinatore, which hooks directly to the front of the machine and automatically froths milk directly into the coffee cup.
The presence of particles, as found in mineralized flotation froths, will change the bulk and surface rheologies in a non-trivial fashion, although the main concepts described herein remain valid.
Frothers are normally surface active agents that aid in the formation and stabilization of air-induced floatation froths. Collectors are also surface active agents that are added to the floatation pulp, where they selectively adsorb on the surface of the particle and render them hydrophobic properties.
Ordinary folk are familiar with the jargon necessary to order their favorite selections at local specialty coffee cafes and even mass coffee outlets are venturing into froths and flavors.
I can work up a big froth over General Motors for far longer periods of time than most of our fellow countrymen, who can only work up very short froths over GM."