frottage


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frottage

[frȯ′täzh]
(graphic arts)
A technique in which a material, such as paper, is placed on a rough or irregular surface and is rubbed with a pencil or paint; the approximate image of the peaks and valleys results; the method is used to copy bas-reliefs, tombstones, and bronzes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A subsequent frottage from the series "Omnipresent Eye" (1936) shows two floating eyeballs on a surreal space-face overlaid with restraining chicken-wire frottage.
In the first story, Frottage, Houghton examines that word's meanings through the epistolary letters from Claire to her therapist, Paul.
The artist's books and frottage drawings reference Land Art in their use of natural materials, but also in their relationship to site, establishing a dialectical relationship similar to that of Robert Smithson's non sites of the late 1960s.
The latter clearly covets a more serious sort of frottage, falling for the pompously dressed Dali from the moment he arrives, and early scenes find the two budding talents coyly eyeing one another, endearingly awkward in their advances.
Steward seek to counter the whitewashing of Thornton Wilder's sexuality in biographies that depended upon the goodwill of Wilder's highly protective sister/executor by offering his own memoir of Wilder's ejaculating after only ninety seconds of frottage. But Harold Norse's extended narrative of W.H.
The outbreak of herpes prevented him from doing more than frottage early one morning with the sexy boy whose door he saw ajar at the bed and breakfast where he was staying with Doug (January 20, 1986).
"Flirtation, fun and frottage are so much more rejuvenating than a facelift.