frustration-aggression hypothesis


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frustration-aggression hypothesis

the theory that frustration increases the likelihood of aggressive behaviour, and aggressive behaviour results from frustration. This involves a circular argument, and, in fact, original proponents of the theory also accepted aggression as an innate drive (see FREUD). A modified version of the theory takes account of the observation that not all aggressive behaviour involves frustration and not all frustration results in aggression – behaviour is also affected by situational factors and by SOCIALIZATION. Nevertheless, the link between frustration and aggression is still accepted.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis; Examination and Reformulation, 106(1), 59-73.
There is even a name for this - the frustration-aggression hypothesis. When an angry outburst includes even a vague threat under zero tolerance, the child is sent home from school.
Expanding on Freud's work, Dollard, Doob, Miller, Mowrer, and Sears (1939) advanced the frustration-aggression hypothesis: "aggression is always a consequence of frustration" (p.
The role of arbitrariness in the frustration-aggression hypothesis. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 47, 728-731.
Frustration-Aggression hypothesis: Examination and reformulation, Psychological Bulletin, 106 (1).
According to the frustration-aggression hypothesis (Fox & Spector, 1999), negative feelings of distress and frustration resulting from FIW may increase employees' tendency to exhibit aggressive behaviors.
BERKOWITZ, L.B., 1989, Frustration-aggression hypothesis: Examination and reformulation.
These chances for learning and opportunities for frustrating situations are consistent with the Revised Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis (Berkowitz, 1965).
This notion, which has been labeled the "frustration-aggression hypothesis," states that when people are frustrated, the aggression drive is stirred up.