fucoid


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Related to fucoid: fucoid algae

fucoid

[′fyü‚kȯid]
(geology)
A tunnellike marking on a sedimentary structure identified as a trace fossil but not referred to a described genus.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Herbivory by Littorina littorea significantly inhibited the recruitment of fucoid seaweeds in all treatment types (Fig.
Physical factors driving intertidal macroalgae distribution: physiological stress of a dominant fucoid at its Southern limit.
The phylogeographic architecture of the fucoid seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum: an intertidal 'marine tree' and survivor of more than one glacial-interglacial cycle.
The growth and gonad production of Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus, which is commercially harvested in western Japan, were greatest in fucoid beds, lower in beds dominated by the small red algae Acrosorium polyneurum and Chondrus spp., and least in barren beds (Agatsuma & Nakata 2004, Agatsuma et al.
Food of the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus nudus and Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus associated with vertical distribution in fucoid beds and crustose coralline fiats in northern Honshu, Japan.
No other fucoid algae were observed along the transect.
In this paper we investigate how water motion is perceived by fucoid algae.
By grazing ephemeral filamentous algae, periwinkles facilitate colonization of larger fleshy macroalgae, such as fucoids and Chondrus crispus (Lubchenco 1980, Lubchenco 1983, Scheibling et al.
Both the depolarization of the oocyte plasma membrane and the polyspermy block in the marine invertebrates and fucoid seaweeds are known to be suppressed in low-sodium ASW (Gould-Somero et al., 1979; Jaffe, 1980; Kline et al., 1985; Brawley, 1991).
Calcium buffer injections block fucoid egg development by facilitating calcium diffusion.
Thus, for example, a nonprey fucoid alga provided a habitat for ephemeral algae, the major food of littorine snails, and thereby indirectly helped maintain high snail density (e.g., web 13: Appendices 1 and 2).
Some of the complex sugars in seaweed are referred to as fucoids (glucans), which may stimulate immune function.