full-duplex Ethernet


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full-duplex Ethernet

An extension to 10Base-T Ethernet implemented in a switched environment that has a dedicated line between the station and switch. It is built into the network adapter (NIC) and switch, providing bi-directional transmission that boosts bandwidth from 10 to 20 Mbps.
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It is expected that this network will provide 1400 Mbps, full-duplex Ethernet throughput with >99.999% error-free availability.
Offering the highest spectral efficiency, it provides up to 3 Gbit/s full-duplex Ethernet throughputs in a 500 MHz channel for delivering mobile network backhaul services at the lowest cost per Gigabit.
For example, 20Mbps can be transferred over a full-duplex Ethernet (10Mbps) link.
The campus network is split into five major zones, each with a Cisco Catalyst 5000 switch connected with 100 Mbps full-duplex Ethernet to a Cisco 7513 router at the core of the network.
The other technologies that integrators believe will follow these three by 1997 include switched ethernet (today's number one choice), 100baseVG, full-duplex ethernet and fibre channel, a high-speed channel (with a British spelling) that uses fiber optic technology and a variety of cable types to interconnect computing devices in small network configurations at speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second.
Full-duplex Ethernet over UTP runs at 20 or 200Mbit/sec, for example, while half-duplex Ethernet over UTP runs at either 10 or l00Mbit/sec.
It's full-duplex Ethernet switching, which doubles the LAN throughput to 20 Mb/s and dedicates the full capacity to a server or other device on the network that might otherwise create a traffic bottleneck.
With full-duplex Ethernet switching, only one station is on the network, so the collision-detection mechanism can be disabled and each pair of wires used to carry 10 Mb/s traffic.
Presently, full-duplex Ethernet is not an IEEE 802.3 standard, but a draft specification is expected before year's end.
Kalpana, Sunnyvale, Calif., pioneered full-duplex Ethernet as an extension to its line of switched Ethernet products.
Also, vendors of full-duplex Ethernet adapters, such as Cogent Data Technologies, Friday Harbor, Wash.; Seeq Technology, Fremont, Calif.; Compaq, Digital Equipment and IBM, are pricing their products to be competitive with half-duplex cards.
At ComNet in Washington, D.C., last January, NBase Switch introduced a full-duplex Ethernet switching hub for workgroups that can provide 20 Mb/s links between a server and up to 12 workstations.