fundamental number

fundamental number

[¦fən·də¦men·təl ′nəm·bər]
(genetics)
The number of chromosome arms of a karyotype.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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It was found that the diploid number (2n), the fundamental number (NF) and the number of autosomal arms (NFa) were 54, 56 and 52, respectively.
LeGrande (1981) proposed a hypothetical ancestral karyotype for Siluriformes with 2n=56 [+ or -] 2 and high Fundamental Number (NF), which was supported by other studies in different species of the order (Oliveira and Gosztonyi, 2000).
The karyotype of the northern population specimen from Itapaje (MN 67469), had a diploid number (2n) of 52 and a fundamental number (FN) of 92, and was comprised of 21 pairs of metacentric/submetacentric chromosomes, and four pairs of acrocentrics.
Previous studies on the Cichlidae family have reported a very constant diploid number 2n = 48 in different species (BENZAQUEM et al., 2008; FELDBERG; BERTOLLO, 1985; LOUREIRO, 1999; MARESCALCHI, 2005; MIZOGUCHI et al., 2007; PERAZZO et al., 2011; THOMPSON, 1979), despite a considerable variation in their fundamental number.
In such cases, fundamental number may be a more biologically relevant measure of variance than diploid number.
Furthermore, karyotypes of certain species show geographical variation in the fundamental number of chromosomes as well as the diploid number of chromosomes as in the Genera Nannospalax and Meriones (5-7).
Fundamental number theory with applications, 2d ed.
It's such a fundamental number yet it's not a big-picture focus.
With a karyotype formula of 46M/SM + 12ST, the fundamental number (FN) was 116; there were no differences between the two populations.

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