fundamental

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fundamental

1. Music denoting or relating to the principal or lowest note of a harmonic series
2. of or concerned with the component of lowest frequency in a complex vibration
3. 
a. the principal or lowest note of a harmonic series
b. the bass note of a chord in root position
4. Physics
a. the component of lowest frequency in a complex vibration
b. the frequency of this component

fundamental

[¦fən·də¦ment·əl]
(physics)
The lowest frequency component of a complex wave. Also known as first harmonic; fundamental component.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, she may wonder why the treatises have enthroned this passage as doctrine by means of the term "fundamental rights" when the passage itself speaks of fundamentality "[to] the race.
27) If fundamentality is the measure of incorporation for each clause of the Bill of Rights, then should it not be the standard for incorporating the specifics of each clause?
244) Related to this, the fundamentality of rights may have relationships to each other.
The particular seductiveness of scientific evidence was that it embodied, at least in principle, many of the attributes as the supposed "neutral" or original constitutional principles on which the Court had, prior to Brown, claimed to rely for its decision-making: objectivity, fundamentality, rationality, inevitability.
Horwitz, The Constitution of Change: Legal Fundamentality Without Fundamentalism, 107 HARV.
Noneism, Ontology, and Fundamentality, TATJANA VON SOLODKOFF and RICHARD WOODWARD
Horwitz, The Constitution of Change--Legal Fundamentality Without Fundamentalism, 107 HARV.
ALEXANDER SKILES, "Getting Grounded: Essays in the Metaphysics of Fundamentality.
Horwitz, The Supreme Court, 1992 Term- Foreword: The Constitution of Change: Legal Fundamentality Without Fundamentalism, 107 HARV.
It appeals to recent discussions in meta-ontology regarding fundamentality and dependence, and shows how emergence can be simply and straightforwardly characterized using these notions.
These architectural features yield the conclusion that intermediaries cannot effectively control access, and given the fundamentality of these features, it might seem unadvisable to make changes that would increase their ability to control.
This analysis recognizes by way of implication that political groups possess characteristics of immutability and fundamentality in common with racial, religious, and national groups.