furrow


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furrow

[′fər·ō]
(engineering)
A trench plowed in the ground.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
It was a succession of luminous furrows, very different from the radiation of Copernicus not long before; they ran parallel with each other.
"Plowed, at all events," retorted Michel Ardan; "but what laborers those Selenites must be, and what giant oxen they must harness to their plow to cut such furrows!"
"They are not furrows," said Barbicane; "they are rifts ."
Whenever I saw her come up the furrow, shouting to her beasts, sunburned, sweaty, her dress open at the neck, and her throat and chest dust-plastered, I used to think of the tone in which poor Mr.
The clocks are on the stroke of three, and the furrow ploughed among the populace is turning round, to come on into the place of execution, and end.
The furrows in his face deepened, the latent humor died out of his eyes.
In a similar manner to that described in the Geological Transactions, the tubes are generally compressed, and have deep longitudinal furrows, so as closely to resemble a shrivelled vegetable stalk, or the bark of the elm or cork tree.
They were long and narrow furrows sunk between parallel ridges, bordering generally upon the edges of the craters.
When they came out of the woods, all his attention was engrossed by the view of the fallow land on the upland, in parts yellow with grass, in parts trampled and checkered with furrows, in parts dotted with ridges of dung, and in parts even ploughed.
These are the remains of rig and furrow (or ridge and furrow as it's known in posh circles) and Scotland was once covered in them.
In selected chapters from their comprehensive casebook Health Law: Cases, Materials, and Problems Furrow and colleagues present a textbook for courses focusing narrowly on the legal framework for addressing quality concerns in health care.
IT could be argued that North East artist Mary Ann Rogers is ploughing a lone furrow for her latest exhibition.