furrow irrigation

furrow irrigation

[′fər·ō ‚ir·ə′gā·shən]
(agriculture)
Irrigation via furrows between rows of crops.
References in periodicals archive ?
Farmers who grow crops under furrow irrigation could save hours of labor every time they water, using a new modification to layflat irrigation tubing recently patented by ARS agricultural engineer Allan S.
Polyacrylamide has been studied extensively for use in furrow irrigation (Lentz et al.
In a more recent application, polyacrylamide-amended irrigation water was used to reduce furrow irrigation induced erosion and sediment loss (Lentz and Sojka, 1994).
PAM is an effective and environmentally safe means of reducing weed seed distribution in furrow irrigation water while simultaneously reducing erosion and increasing infiltration in weed-free crop production.
Field furrow irrigation studies have shown typical net infiltration increases as compared to controls of 15% to 50% (increasing with clay content) with PAM treatment (McCutchan et al.
Conversely, runoff is often planned with furrow irrigation to improve infiltration uniformity by reducing the difference in infiltration opportunity times between upper and lower ends of fields.
Approximately 40% of Idaho's irrigated cropland located on the Snake River Plain in the southern part of the state is surface irrigated with furrow irrigation being the predominant form.
Other high-efficiency irrigation methods, like different types of furrow irrigation and sprinklers based on the farmers' needs, were also being explored, Elahi stated.
Mathew and Kuruvilla (2005) expressed that among the methods of irrigation, furrow irrigation and alternate furrow irrigation had registered comparatively higher values for juice quality parameters like sucrose content, brix, commercial cane sugar (CCS) percent, and purity coefficient with lesser content of reducing sugar and fiber content.
Organic tomato yields for 20 years under furrow irrigation were not significantly different from conventional tomato yields.
From time in memorial farmers are accustomed to irrigate their crops by flooding as they do for rice and wheat or furrow irrigation as they do for some other crops.