fuse


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Related to fuse: electrical fuse

fuse

a protective device for safeguarding electric circuits, etc., containing a wire that melts and breaks the circuit when the current exceeds a certain value
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

FUSE

(fyooz) Abbrev. for Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Fuse

An electrical safety device inserted in a circuit to prevent overload; excessive current melts a wire inside a fuse, which interrupts the flow. It is no longer functional once this happens, unlike a circuit breaker, which can be reset.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fuse

 

a simple device for protecting electric circuits from overloads and short circuits. A fuse consists of one or several fuse links, an insulating body, and terminals for connecting the fuse to an electric circuit. Some fuses are filled with quartz sand to provide better cooling of the fuse link and to quench the arc; some have actuation indicators. Flat fuse links have narrowed sections that melt first. Fuses are series-connected in an electric circuit and break the circuit when the fuse link melts.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

fuse

[fyüz]
(electricity)
An expendable device for opening an electric circuit when the current therein becomes excessive, containing a section of conductor which melts when the current through it exceeds a rated value for a definite period of time. Also known as electric fuse.
(engineering)
Also spelled fuze.
A device with explosive components designed to initiate a train of fire or detonation in an item of ammunition by an action such as hydrostatic pressure, electrical energy, chemical energy, impact, or a combination of these.
A nonexplosive device designed to initiate an explosion in an item of ammunition by an action such as continuous or pulsating electromagnetic waves or acceleration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Fuse (electricity)

An expendable protective device that eliminates overload on an electric circuit. The fuse is connected in series with the circuit being protected. The components of a typical low-voltage high-power fuse are a fuse element or wire, an insulating material support and housing, two metal end fittings, and a filler (see illustration).

Power fuse assemblyenlarge picture
Power fuse assembly

The fuse element is a silver strip or wire that melts when the current is higher than the rated value. The melting of the wire generates an electric arc. The extinction of this arc interrupts the current and protects the circuit. The fuse element is connected to the metal end fittings which serve as terminals.

The filler facilitates the arc extinction. The most commonly used filler is sand, which surrounds the fuse element. When the fuse element melts, the heat of the arc melts the sand near the element. This removes energy from the arc, creating a channel filled with the mixture of melted sand and metal. The metal particles from the melting fuse wire are absorbed by the melted sand. This increases the channel resistance, which leads to the gradual reduction of the current and the extinction of the arc. The insulating support and the tubular housing holds the fuse elements and the filler, which also serves as insulator after the fuse has interrupted the current.

The interruption time is the sum of the melting and the arcing time. It is inversely proportional to the current, that is, a higher current melts the wire faster. The fuse operates in a time-current band between maximum interruption time and minimum meeting time. It protects the electric circuit if the fault current is interrupted before the circuit elements are overheated. The arc extinction often generates overvoltages, which produce flashovers and damage. A properly designed fuse operates without overvoltage, which is controlled by the shape of the fuse element and by the filler.

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Engineering. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fuse

fuse of the cartridge type
An overcurrent protective device consisting of a metal strip, ribbon, or wire which is designed to open an electric circuit by melting if a predetermined current is exceeded.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fuse

i. A portion of a circuit made of wire with a low melting point that melts and breaks the circuit when the current is above limits.
ii. In armaments, an element that activates the ignition train. The fuse may be time-sensitive or height-sensitive, or it may operate on impact or after some time of flight.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

FUSE

A DEC software development environment for ULTRIX, offering an integrated toolkit for developing, testing, debugging and maintenance.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

fuse

(1) A protective device that is designed to melt, or blow, when a specified amount of current is passed through it. PROM chips are created as a series of fuses that are selectively blown in order to create the binary patterns of the data or machine language.

(2) To bond together.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was no update offered by Fuse on if any return to Xfinity or Verizon FiOS is in the works.
History is made again as Troopers assigned to Alpha Battery, Field Artillery, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, fired XM1156 Precision Guidance Kit, or PGK, fuses using M777A2 Howitzer weapon systems during the unit's first-ever field demonstration of the ammunition, at the Grafenwoehr Training Area, located near Rose Barracks, Germany, last July 24.
For more information |about FUSE and how you can either join or support their work, please contact Jane Meakin, FUSE Director, at jane.meakin@clwyd-theatr-cymru.co.uk or call 01352 701576.
Secondary protection with physical fuses is necessary to back up the primary hot-swap controller IC.
If you replace the fuse and it blows again, take it to a shop--you've got an electrical problem that requires a pro.
Fuses are required to contain any violence or fire that occurs during the internal arc that is created when the fuse opens under a short-circuit condition.
According to the model, FUSE observed low amounts of deuterium within 100 light-years of the sun because that region has a high abundance of carbon dust that's been undisturbed for millions of years, Linsky says.
(A) FUSE: Once lit, it activates the lift charge and, ultimately, the burst charge.
"We received 23 calls from 25 different agencies basically saying, 'Wow, who is Fuse? Is this a black-owned agency?
It works, but does not have a lamp on the fuse holder cap like tire other fuse holders.
To eliminate this unwanted appearance, it is usually best to design the sculpture in modular units, and then assemble the units to hide the fuse lines.