fuse


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Related to fuse: electrical fuse

fuse

a protective device for safeguarding electric circuits, etc., containing a wire that melts and breaks the circuit when the current exceeds a certain value

FUSE

(fyooz) Abbrev. for Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer.

Fuse

An electrical safety device inserted in a circuit to prevent overload; excessive current melts a wire inside a fuse, which interrupts the flow. It is no longer functional once this happens, unlike a circuit breaker, which can be reset.

Fuse

 

a simple device for protecting electric circuits from overloads and short circuits. A fuse consists of one or several fuse links, an insulating body, and terminals for connecting the fuse to an electric circuit. Some fuses are filled with quartz sand to provide better cooling of the fuse link and to quench the arc; some have actuation indicators. Flat fuse links have narrowed sections that melt first. Fuses are series-connected in an electric circuit and break the circuit when the fuse link melts.

fuse

[fyüz]
(electricity)
An expendable device for opening an electric circuit when the current therein becomes excessive, containing a section of conductor which melts when the current through it exceeds a rated value for a definite period of time. Also known as electric fuse.
(engineering)
Also spelled fuze.
A device with explosive components designed to initiate a train of fire or detonation in an item of ammunition by an action such as hydrostatic pressure, electrical energy, chemical energy, impact, or a combination of these.
A nonexplosive device designed to initiate an explosion in an item of ammunition by an action such as continuous or pulsating electromagnetic waves or acceleration.

Fuse (electricity)

An expendable protective device that eliminates overload on an electric circuit. The fuse is connected in series with the circuit being protected. The components of a typical low-voltage high-power fuse are a fuse element or wire, an insulating material support and housing, two metal end fittings, and a filler (see illustration).

Power fuse assemblyenlarge picture
Power fuse assembly

The fuse element is a silver strip or wire that melts when the current is higher than the rated value. The melting of the wire generates an electric arc. The extinction of this arc interrupts the current and protects the circuit. The fuse element is connected to the metal end fittings which serve as terminals.

The filler facilitates the arc extinction. The most commonly used filler is sand, which surrounds the fuse element. When the fuse element melts, the heat of the arc melts the sand near the element. This removes energy from the arc, creating a channel filled with the mixture of melted sand and metal. The metal particles from the melting fuse wire are absorbed by the melted sand. This increases the channel resistance, which leads to the gradual reduction of the current and the extinction of the arc. The insulating support and the tubular housing holds the fuse elements and the filler, which also serves as insulator after the fuse has interrupted the current.

The interruption time is the sum of the melting and the arcing time. It is inversely proportional to the current, that is, a higher current melts the wire faster. The fuse operates in a time-current band between maximum interruption time and minimum meeting time. It protects the electric circuit if the fault current is interrupted before the circuit elements are overheated. The arc extinction often generates overvoltages, which produce flashovers and damage. A properly designed fuse operates without overvoltage, which is controlled by the shape of the fuse element and by the filler.

fuse

fuse of the cartridge type
An overcurrent protective device consisting of a metal strip, ribbon, or wire which is designed to open an electric circuit by melting if a predetermined current is exceeded.

fuse

i. A portion of a circuit made of wire with a low melting point that melts and breaks the circuit when the current is above limits.
ii. In armaments, an element that activates the ignition train. The fuse may be time-sensitive or height-sensitive, or it may operate on impact or after some time of flight.

FUSE

A DEC software development environment for ULTRIX, offering an integrated toolkit for developing, testing, debugging and maintenance.

fuse

(1) A protective device that is designed to melt, or blow, when a specified amount of current is passed through it. PROM chips are created as a series of fuses that are selectively blown in order to create the binary patterns of the data or machine language.

(2) To bond together.
References in classic literature ?
And if you're right careful to see that the tool-boxes the boys leave are all locked--so's no powder can catch, you know--and always start lighting against the air, so that if there's gas and it catches the fire'll blow away from you instead of following you up--and if you examine the fuses to see they're long enough and the powder is tamped in just right--each miner does that before he leaves and lots of firers just give 'em a hasty once-over instead of a real look--and then shake your heels good and fast after you do fire--"
We had commenced to think that the fuse had been put out while the piece was rolling down the stairway, or that the Mahars had guessed its purpose and ex-tinguished it themselves, when the ground about the entrance rose suddenly into the air, to be followed by a terrific explosion and a burst of smoke and flame that shot high in company with dirt, stone, and fragments of cannon.
One can't get him to talk about it, but the fuse was short, the survivors leaped overboard, while he slipped his anchor and got away.
His work was realism, though he had endeavored to fuse with it the fancies and beauties of imagination.
It was Mauki who supplied the key that opened the padlock on the boat, and it was Mauki who equipped the boat with a dozen Winchesters, an immense amount of ammunition, a case of dynamite with detonators and fuse, and ten cases of tobacco.
Further, I say, that, if you will stay with me, I will teach you all the secrets of the glass-stainers' mystery: the pigments and their thickening, which will fuse into the glass and which will not, the furnace and the glazing--every trick and method you shall know.
He attached the fuse by wrapping the "giant" tightly in a piece of cotton.
If you light a fuse and connect it with a heap of dynamite, the explosion of the dynamite may be spoken of, in a sense, as a delayed response to your lighting of the fuse.
But if the notches in his forehead wouldn't fuse together, and if his face would work and couldn't play, what could he do, poor man!
Her glance was by no means stupid; it beamed out soft and dif fuse as the moon beams upon a landscape--quite differently from the scrutinising inspection of the stars.
Then he leaned the powder bag against it, ripped a hole in it with his knife, and attached the fuse.
For the drawer was filled with a heterogeneous mess of dynamite sticks, boxes of fulminating caps, coils of fuses, lead sinkers, iron tools, and many boxes of rifle, revolver and pistol cartridges.