fusion crust

fusion crust

[′fyü·zhən ‚krəst]
(geology)
A thin, glassy coating, usually black and rerely more than 1 millimeter thick, which is formed by ablation on the surface of a meteorite.
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A preliminary analysis by Marc Fries, Cosmic Dust Curator at NASA's Johnson Space Center, revealed two small fragments characteristic of the smooth fusion crust that forms during a bolide's plunge through Earth's atmosphere.
"Most meteorites are typically quick small, and have a black fusion crust, which gives them a resemblance to charcoal," he said, according to (http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/index.ssf/2018/01/nasa_expert_meteorites_may_hav.html) Michigan-based MLive.
Scientists said that the dark, glassy surface of the rock, known as a fusion crust, and indentations on its surface were the classic markings of a meteorite and seemed to confirm its origins.
This material is distinct from the 'fusion crust' - the thin layer of material on the surface of the meteorite that melts, then solidifies, as it travels through the Earth's atmosphere.
"One of the rocks would have been from the outside of the meteorite and has a black coating called fusion crust which makes it more valuable," said Rob.
University of Wisconsin geology professor John Valley says the fragment has a so-called fusion crust. The paper-thin blackened coating results when a meteor superheats as it speeds through the atmosphere.
I had no doubt about my rock's extraterrestrial origin: its dark black fusion crust stood out prominently among the dead crops.
"The result is a glassy fusion crust that is about a millimetre thick.
You can tell which ones are meteorites by looking for the fusion crust, a thin, glassy coating that formed when the meteorite superheated during its fall through Earth's atmosphere.
Just about every meteorite has a shiny, black surface called a fusion crust. This fusion crust is created during the meteorite's fiery flight.
A thin gray-green "fusion crust," probably formed by the heat of the meteorites' descent through Earth's atmosphere, covers about 30 percent of their surfaces.
The stunning green of their fusion crust, created by flash heating while diving into Earth's atmosphere, prompted Ralew to send samples to meteorite expert Anthony Irving (University of Washington).