fusion zone

fusion zone

[′fyü·zhən ‚zōn]
(metallurgy)
The volume of base or parent metal melted during a welding operation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also impacts vital components of the welding technique- undercut tendency, surface shape patterns, weld penetration, welding speed, fusion zone width and metal transfer and arc characteristics.
When performing RSW, microstructural changes in the fusion zone (FZ) and surrounding heat-affected zone (HAZ) affect the weld mechanical properties which need to be specified to develop optimized welding procedures for these steels [9].
The results of many hardness tests show that, when welding with TIG, MIG technology, the heat affected zone (HAZ) area hardness is usually higher than the center of the seam, but closer to the base metal (BM), possibly due to annealing, the hardness reaches the value of the fusion zone (FZ) [3, 4].
All studies indicate that the FCGR of the weld fusion zone and/or HAZ is at least an order of magnitude higher in the presence of hydrogen than in air at values of the stress intensity range ([DELTA]K) greater than 15 MPa x [m.sup.1/2].
A fusion zone formed between the injured kidney and the omentum contained abundant stem cells expressing stem cell antigen-1, Wilms' tumor-1, and CD34.
It can be seen that there are fusion zone and heat-affect zone in the steel, which exhibits hemi-ellipsoidal shape, as shown in Figure 5(a).
The 71-year-old Chicagoan Jack DeJohnette is one of jazz music's master sticksmen, notable as a Miles Davis sideman, just as the trumpeter was entering his fusion zone at the close of the 1960s.
If the specimen breaks outside the weld and fusion zone (that is, in the parent pipe material) and meets the minimum tensile-strength requirements of the specification, the weld shall be accepted as meeting the requirements.
The angle of the wedge is optimised to reduce the electronic steering with the probe elements while still covering the weld fusion zone.
During this cooling, the material contracts, creating tensile stresses in the fusion zone. When using short welding intervals (5 ms), the welding belt might crack.