future

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future

[′fyü·chər]
(relativity)
For an event in space-time, those events that can be reached by a signal that is emitted at the original event and moves at a speed less than or equal to the speed of light in a vacuum.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The hard reality is they are not criminals, deviants or drug abusers; but are simply helpless, resource less, futureless innocent living creatures, who feel nobody thinks for them.
And there's no way to separate the mobilization of this abstract, disappearing artist from the wider, systemic (and some would say anthropological) crisis we are living through now: The two phenomena are linked to the same automatisms, installed within the same futureless no-time of cybernetworks.
It is generally accepted that Finnic languages constitute a part of the "futureless" area of Northern Europe as future time reference remains often ungrammaticalized or is only partly grammaticalized (e.g.
Van Niekerk' splay-seems to register the present moment in South Africa with this same sense of the eternal present of the eschaton', a futureless world which offers economic opportunity and no redemption.
This individualized mind-screen cinema of uninvited absence, the dream of a futureless home, has replaced Hollywood, and the game machines will not satisfy as a distraction for too much longer.
Major West justifies this enterprise by contrasting it with the infected, who "will never bake bread, plant crops, [or] raise livestock" because they are "futureless." Major West's speculative future is predicated upon a sharp distinction between inside and outside, saved and infected, and those who plan and those who cannot plan.
"Danced with the Devil" follows futureless drifter William Wilson, who finds himself a murderer of accident.
(1) "The world-city, the land-devouring demon, has set its rootless and futureless men in motion <...>" (Spengler 1932 II: 427, footnote 5).
"Futureless persons": Shifting life expectancies and the vicissitudes of progressive illness.
Many of the characters contemplate living their homeland not because they feel the need to adhere to a growing trend, but because their lives seem futureless. With wit and a very sharp critical eye, Mungiu examines life in the post-communist Romania, an existence meant to deal simultaneously with the multiple practices inherited from the past and the challenges raised by the new society.