gadolinite


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gadolinite

[′gad·əl·ə‚nīt]
(mineralogy)
Be2FeY2Si2O10 A black, greenish-black, or brown rare-earth mineral; hardness is 6.5-7 on Mohs scale, and specific gravity is 4-4.5.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barringer had already shipped off 1000 pounds of gadolinite and other minerals to see if anyone could figure out what they were and whether they had any value, but was disappointed with the evaluation.
To my great surprise, the first pick I put in the ground brought to the surface a huge crystal of gadolinite, and for a short time I enjoyed the most pleasant excitement, bringing out crystal after crystal from the decomposed feldspar, until the pile must have weighed 30 pounds.
This good news spurred further searching which turned up large quantities of fluorite, muscovite, magnetite, menaccinite, molybdenite, graphite, columbite, allanite, several more pounds of fergusonite and ultimately over 200 pounds of gadolinite. (In 1895 Niven arranged the purchase of the Barringer Hill deposit from John Barringer, on behalf of Thomas Edison's Piedmont Mining Company, for $5,000 in gold coin.
Hisinger and Berzelius performed new analyses of both gadolinite and the red Bastnas mineral and came to the conclusion that a new element having several characteristics in common with yttria was contained in the "Bastnas tungsten." Further analyses done during the winter of 1803-1804 confirmed this.
(1984) A refinement of the crystal structure of gadolinite. American Mineralogist, 69, 948-953.
(1974) Mineralogie de la France (allanite, bastnasite, gadolinite, monazite, parisite, synchisite).
Cotelo Neiva and Correia Neves (1960) report the occurrence of rare gadolinite at the Muiane mine.