galactic disk

galactic disk

See galaxies; Galaxy.

galactic disk

[gə′lak·tik ′disk]
(astronomy)
The flat distribution of stars and interstellar matter in the spiral arms and plane of the Milky Way Galaxy.
References in periodicals archive ?
These structures are pushed off the plane of the Milky Way when a massive dwarf galaxy passes through the galactic disk.
Although it is bright, the galaxy sits near the equator of the Milky Way's galactic disk, where the sky is thick with glowing cosmic gas, bright stars, and dark, obscuring dust.
The galaxy bar, spiral arms and even galactic rings are structures that can be interpreted as disturbance to axisymmetric potential of the galactic disk.
It's falling toward the galactic disk at nearly 300 km/s (660,000 mph).
Nobody had seen the arm segment before because the galactic disk turns out to be slightly warped in the outer reaches, like a Frisbee left too long in the sun.
It is thought that the combined ejecta would have broken through the con fining pressure of interstellar gas in the galaxy and erupted to high altitudes above the galactic disk.
If so, it's likely that planets will eventually form from this material, as is the case for young stars in the galactic disk.
And high-resolution simulations of the early universe also suggest that cold streams can directly connect to the edge of a galactic disk and feed the galaxy like a fuel line (see right).
It is in the galactic disk, and not inside a globular cluster.
We find that classical evolution paradigm of gradual enrichment and dynamical heating of the Galactic disk seem to fail several of the standard tests related to the stellar metallicity distribution, age-metallicity relation, and age-velocity relation.
Most star clusters in the galactic disk dissolve rapidly, their stars migrating away from each other under the influence of gravitational tides.
Because of the remnant's outgoing motion, theorists have proposed that the star that became Kepler's supernova was, in fact, born in the galactic disk with a partner star.