galactic radiation

galactic radiation

[gə′lak·tik rād·ē′ā·shən]
(astrophysics)
Radiation emanating from the Milky Way Galaxy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The interaction between the solar wind and the medium of our galaxy creates a complex host of interactions, which is thought to shield the majority of harmful galactic radiation that reaches Earth and fills the solar system.
Solar and galactic radiation of meter to millimeter wavelengths was discovered last.
Even before the official formation of Program C, the Naval Research Lab pioneered space reconnaissance with the development of the Galactic Radiation and Background (GRAB) satellite launched in 1961 to collect electronic intelligence.
The purpose of GRAB, the Galactic Radiation and Background Experiment, was to measure solar radiation.
It was in 1965 that two Bell Labs physicists, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, set up an experiment to measure the radio emission coming from the Milky Way galaxy and were in the process of calibrating their antenna at a wavelength of 7 cm, where galactic radiation was at a minimum.
Physical infirmities prevented him from participating in the NRL Diamond Jubilee in 1993 and the initial public disclosure of Project GRAB (Galactic RAdiation and Background; an ELINT satellite) by Keith Hall, Deputy Director of the National Reconnaissance Office.
In 1965, a couple of physicists at Bell Labs, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, were in the process of measuring the radio mission coming from our galaxy, the Milky Way, and had calibrated their antenna at a wave-length of 7 cm, where galactic radiation is at a negligible minimum.