galactic wind

galactic wind

A substantial outflow of hot gas from a galaxy that has recently suffered a high burst of star formation or a merger. The gas has a velocity of a few hundred kilometers per second and is usually hot enough to emit in X-rays. The occurrence of galactic winds has implications for the energetics, chemical enrichment, and evolution of galaxies and their environment.
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Spilker's observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), show -- for the first time -- a powerful galactic wind of molecules in a galaxy seen when the universe was only 1 billion years old.
Caption: SPEEDING STARBIRTH Astronomers found stars forming within the galactic wind pouring out of the galaxy IRAS F23128-5919, depicted here in an artist's conception.
The energy supplied by SNeII could be enough to unbind a fraction of the ISM and produce a galactic wind (see also Section 9).
Black hole winds may be linked to another type of galactic wind. Last year, researchers reported that many galaxies in the early universe generated winds that blew material from one galaxy to another (SN: 4/20/02, p.
A particularly troublesome cloud zone in a star-forming region near the Aquila Rift, about 80 light years away, was clearly headed our way pushed by galactic wind, and may collide with the Earth's protective bubble within the next 50,000 years.
Some of this gas could escape in the form of a galactic wind. But it could also cool and fall back to the disk in the form of IVCs, forming a vast, fountainlike circulation pattern between the disk and the halo.
On the other side of the boundary, electrically charged particles from the galactic wind blow by, but rebound off the heliosheath, never to enter the solar system.
They can trace the observed ultrahigh-energy particles directly back to M87 by assuming that our Milky Way has a large, thin "galactic wind" carrying a magnetic field out to great distances, much like the Sun's solar wind filling the solar system.
At first, the supernovas "blew off the caps" of the galaxy; later explosions have created a "galactic wind" that keeps blowing gas out of the galaxy, Tully says.
One of the AGN's effect is the galactic winds, which play a role in star formation.
The observed CH+ reveals dense shock waves, powered by hot, fast galactic winds originating inside the galaxies star forming regions.
But those produced in the EAGLE (Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environments) simulation have proved to be more realistic thanks in large part to recreating strong galactic winds - cosmic gas gales driven by stars, supernova explosions and supermassive black holes.