galley


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galley,

long, narrow vessel widely used in ancient and medieval times, propelled principally by oars but also fitted with sails. The earliest type was sometimes 150 ft (46 m) long with 50 oars. Rowers were slaves, prisoners of war, or (later) convicts; they were usually chained to benches set along the sides, the center of the vessel being used for cargo. Galleys were decked at the bow and stern but were otherwise open. The typical galley was the trireme, with three banks of oars; smaller and more manageable galleys (biremes) had two banks. These vessels became very large, some reputedly having as many as 40 banks of oars, but smaller vessels were again common by the 1st cent. B.C. When galleys were employed in war, the sides were so designed that they could be raised to afford protection for the rowers. The Romans used hooks to fasten onto enemy vessels and carried bridges for boarding. Galleys were used in the Mediterranean by the French and Venetians until the 17th cent. In modern usage the galley is the kitchen of a ship.

Galley

 

a wooden rowing warship created by the Venetians in the seventh century. It was 40-50 m long and about 6 m wide, with a draft of about 2 m and one row of 16 to 25 pairs of oars. Each oar was operated by five or six slave oarsmen who wore leg chains; the whole crew together with the soldiers was about 450 men. The speed of the galley was up to 7 knots (13 km/hr) in calm weather. It had two masts with sails fore and aft. From the 14th century on, its artillery consisted of five guns. The bow was equipped with an above-water ram. The fleets of all countries had galleys. In Russia, Peter I in the late 17th century created a galley fleet, which developed parallel to the sailing ships until the late 18th century. On the Russian galleys the oarsmen were soldiers.

galley

[′gal·ē]
(engineering)
The kitchen of a ship, airplane, or trailer.
(graphic arts)
A flat, oblong, open-ended tray into which the letters assembled by hand in a composing stick are transferred after the composing stick is full.

galley

The onboard meal service preparation area.

galley

1. any of various kinds of ship propelled by oars or sails used in ancient or medieval times as a warship or as a trader
2. the kitchen of a ship, boat, or aircraft
3. any of various long rowing boats
References in periodicals archive ?
Galley also said he was drafted into the Navy in 1974, months after the draft ended in 1973.
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