galvanism


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galvanism

[′gal·və‚niz·əm]
(biology)
The use of a galvanic current for medical or biological purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
In light of that phenomenon, certainly it seems fitting that both the author and his work be "resurrected,", not through galvanism but by our modern social networks.
(2) Galvanism and faradism became the mainstay of therapies for some of the most prevalent 'nervous' conditions known in the 19th century, including hysteria, neurasthenia and hypochondria, and a number of electrical consumer products were developed to 'recharge' people's ailing constitutions.
The treatments frequently included surgery, often quite radical, or electrical treatments', such as faradism or galvanism. Regarding galvanism a 31 year old female teacher reported in 1892; "The last of October the doctor commenced the use of a battery every night,--the interrupted current being used.
Darwin, and some of the physiological writers of Germany, as not of impossible occurrence." In other words, her fictional extrapolations about galvanism and the spark of life rested on firm scientific foundations.
"But what we are especially at a loss to understand," said Doctor Ponnonner, "is how it happens that, having been dead and buried in Egypt five thousand years ago, you are here to-day all alive, and looking so delightfully well." "Had I been, as you say, dead," replied the Count, "it is more than probable that dead I should still be; for I perceive you are yet in the infancy of Galvanism, and cannot accomplish with it what was a common thing among us in the old days.
Then she listened to a conversation between Byron and Shelley on the emerging science of galvanism, which demonstrated that electrical currents could stimulate nerves and muscles, even in corpses.
She and a group of literary friends spent the strangely stormy summer discussing both the old and the new: traditional Germanic ghost stories and recent experiments in galvanism (an Italian anatomist Galvani had applied electricity to a dead frog, producing movement).
The comparisons made between electricity and sympathy (where sympathy was held to be internal rather than external to the body) could suggest galvanism particularly and Luigi Galvani's idea of animal electricity, for example.
(12) His fame gave the world the word "volt" (for the measure of force of an electrical current), though of course this fame came not from his refutation of galvanism but for his invention of the battery, called a "voltaic pile" in his day (and in Shelley's novel).
Studious Ingrid finds herself drawn to her father's notebooks describing his disturbing experiments with galvanism and the reanimation of corpses.
Galvanism is the phenomenon most closely associated with the cause of sentient life.