gamma ray


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gamma ray

[′gam·ə ‚rā]
(nuclear physics)
A high-energy photon, especially as emitted by a nucleus in a transition between two energy levels.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radioactive atoms are unstable and give off various types of radiation; the types of use for nuclear detection are gamma rays and neutrons.
Gamma rays originating from this high-activity area provide for subsequent background noise that is detected as real, recorded [gamma]-rays, but not indicative of SLN's.
Then came CGRO, equipped with four sensitive instruments to observe and measure gamma rays.
Another class of effects leads to gamma ray asymmetries from beta decays of polarized nuclei produced by interactions of the beam with materials upstream of the hydrogen target.
But gamma ray observations let scientists see past the shroud to an object 100,000 times more luminous than the Crab Nebula, left behind in our galaxy by a star explosion 1,000 years ago.
Through a variety of mechanisms, these speedy particles can lead to the emission of gamma rays, the most powerful form of light and a signal that travels to us directly from its sources.
Analysts utilize linear accelerators, gamma ray detectors, and digital signal processors to perform in-depth material science investigations.
Gamma-ray astronomy got a big boost in 1991 with the launch of the NASA's now-defunct Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO).
Working with publicly available data from NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, de Boer and two colleagues analyzed an excess of medium-energy gamma rays observed by the satellite's Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope in the 1990s.
to refine its development concept for NASA's Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), a successor to the TRW-built Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton GRO).
Occasionally, a gamma ray collides with starlight and transforms into a pair of particles-an electron and its antimatter counterpart, a positron.