garden of the Hesperides

garden of the Hesperides

in this garden grew a tree with golden apples. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 109]
See: Heaven

Garden of the Hesperides

quiet garden of the gods where golden apples grew. [Gk. Lit.: Hippolytus; Gk. Myth.: Gaster, 25]
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References in classic literature ?
They belonged to a Polynesian garden of the Hesperides.
This garden of the Hesperides was sometimes thought to be the same as the fabled island of Atlantis of which we have already heard.
I have come hither because this is my most convenient road to the garden of the Hesperides, whither I am going to get three of the golden apples for King Eurystheus.
The two men saw the commercial possibilities of exploiting the new rage for classical antiquities, and these three-handled vessels took their shape from a vase in the collection of Sir William Hamilton, while its red-figure decoration of Hercules in the Garden of the Hesperides came from a plate in Hamilton's catalogue.
Guarded by a serpent, they grew in the Garden of the Hesperides, the Sunset goddesses, at the western end of the world where Atlas stood holding up the heavens.
The Garden echoes the Pagan Garden of the Hesperides, or the Biblical Eden, later transformed into our Christian Paradise (Comellini 1985).
Discussing Turner's work, The Garden of the Hesperides, Ruskin considers that there is a direct relationship between any work of art and the society within which it was produced.
He recognized the garden of the Hesperides at once" (Perelandra 41).
Called Garden of the Hesperides tazza, it was modelled with four naked female figures - the Hesperides - who according to Greek mythology, tended the orchard where the immortality-giving golden apples grew.
Atlas holds up the world, but Herakles needs him to pick the golden apples from the Garden of the Hesperides, and he escapes once, but is tricked into assuming the burden again.
Draco represents the dragon that guarded the golden apples in the Garden of the Hesperides and lies with one of the feet of Hercules, its slayer, firmly planted upon its head.
Classical writers linked the Canaries with the Garden of the Hesperides, the Elysian Fields, and even the lost continent of Atlantis.