garden of the Hesperides

garden of the Hesperides

in this garden grew a tree with golden apples. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 109]
See: Heaven

Garden of the Hesperides

quiet garden of the gods where golden apples grew. [Gk. Lit.: Hippolytus; Gk. Myth.: Gaster, 25]
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References in classic literature ?
They belonged to a Polynesian garden of the Hesperides. There was something strangely alive in them, as though they were created in a stage of the earth's dark history when things were not irrevocably fixed to their forms.
This garden of the Hesperides was sometimes thought to be the same as the fabled island of Atlantis of which we have already heard.
I have come hither because this is my most convenient road to the garden of the Hesperides, whither I am going to get three of the golden apples for King Eurystheus."
A special tree also features as a nod to the island's own legend of the Garden of the Hesperides - believed by some Greek thinkers to be located in the Canary Islands.
The lack of detailed understanding of Etruscan rites and language makes the parallels Egeler is attempting to establish--a clear, overarching Mediterranean association between the afterlife and a sea voyage for deceased souls--stretched at best, and a lot seems to depend on whether Etruscan depictions of sea creatures on funerary displays are a core motif or a flourish, or exactly whether the Garden of the Hesperides counts as transmarine and is therefore a useful part of the analysis.
Psyche and the Garden of the Hesperides in Greek mythology, or the
The two men saw the commercial possibilities of exploiting the new rage for classical antiquities, and these three-handled vessels took their shape from a vase in the collection of Sir William Hamilton, while its red-figure decoration of Hercules in the Garden of the Hesperides came from a plate in Hamilton's catalogue.
Guarded by a serpent, they grew in the Garden of the Hesperides, the Sunset goddesses, at the western end of the world where Atlas stood holding up the heavens.
We may conclude then that, by considering Turner's Garden of the Hesperides as a clue to the spiritual status of his epoch, Ruskin offers an indication of the manner of his comments as a social critic.
Called Garden of the Hesperides tazza, it was modelled with four naked female figures - the Hesperides - who according to Greek mythology, tended the orchard where the immortality-giving golden apples grew.
Atlas holds up the world, but Herakles needs him to pick the golden apples from the Garden of the Hesperides, and he escapes once, but is tricked into assuming the burden again.
Draco represents the dragon that guarded the golden apples in the Garden of the Hesperides and lies with one of the feet of Hercules, its slayer, firmly planted upon its head.