garlic mustard


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Related to garlic mustard: Giant Hogweed, Japanese knotweed
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garlic mustard

garlic mustard

Not actually a garlic or mustard. A super highly nutritious healing powerhouse, garlic mustard is one of the first plants to come up early in spring and stays years round. It is said to be one of the most nutritious leafy greens ever analyzed. It's used to treat gangrene, ulcers, has vitamin A, C,(called "North American Wasabi") Dry the leaves, powder it and use as great spice. Can be mixed with horseradish for the familiar greenish colored wasabi used in sushi places. The leaves are shiny with white flowers. Leaves look similar to Ground Ivy, but have sharp toothed edges and smell like mustard, while Ground Ivy has rounded scalloped edges and smells like mint. Both plants are edible, there are no poisonous lookalikes. The best time to consume garlic mustard is when the young shoots come out of the ground, just before the white flowers show up. The stalks are the best part, but you can eat the whole plant. Garlic mustard is very aggressive and will overtake a forest or garden because it's roots put out a chemical that kills beneficial soil organisms that allow other plants to grow. Do not replant it in your garden or property because it will overtake everything. Used for asthma, antiseptic, bronchitis, eczema, antibacterial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Susceptibility of Brassicaceous crop varieties to powdery mildew.--We examined the susceptibility of several commercially available Brassicaceous crop varieties to the powdery mildew that infects garlic mustard in two trials in the greenhouse.
Predictive modeling of the potential distribution of garlic mustard has been attempted, producing alarming results.
Successful management of garlic mustard may require focusing simultaneously on both adult and juvenile plants.
Allelochemicals isolated from tissues of the invasive weed garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata).
Invasion pattern of herb garlic mustard (Alliaria peliolata) in high quality forests.
Major management concerns regarding garlic mustard invasion center on the restructuring of understory plant communities.
"The first ever Appalachian Trail Garlic Mustard Challenge was a huge success thanks to all the Trail Management Clubs and volunteers who participated," said Marian Orlousky, northern resource management coordinator for the ATC.
The silicate remains of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) along with animal and fish residues were discovered through microfossil analysis of carbonised food deposits from pots found at sites in Denmark and Germany.
(bikers looking for garlic mustard; students searching for pikas)
A good example is garlic mustard, an introduced species usually described as an aggressive invader that chokes out native plant species.
Barb claims that one of the ways foragers can actually help the woodlands is to harvest garlic mustard. "You probably already know that garlic mustard is a non-native invasive that is choking out low-lying woodland vegetation.
The catch is that "wildlife in all its forms" includes the malaria parasite, the polio virus and the invasive garlic mustard in the woods behind my house - wildlife that may have intrinsic value, but offend other priorities.