Garret


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garret

[′gar·ət]
(building construction)
The part of a house just under the roof.

Garret

A room or space located just beneath the roof of a house usually with sloping ceilings; sometimes called an attic.

garret

1. Space within a roof structure; sometimes called an attic.
2. A room, usually with sloping ceilings, just beneath the roof of a house.
References in classic literature ?
The sleeping-room of Cassy was directly under the garret. One day, without consulting Legree, she suddenly took it upon her, with some considerable ostentation, to change all the furniture and appurtenances of the room to one at some considerable distance.
Anne's laugh, as blithe and irresistible as of yore, with an added note of sweetness and maturity, rang through the garret. Marilla in the kitchen below, compounding blue plum preserve, heard it and smiled; then sighed to think how seldom that dear laugh would echo through Green Gables in the years to come.
"Therefore no one inhabits it, only, you see this garret has two windows which look out upon the Place."
London, which she never saw, was to her a monster that licked up country youths as they stepped from the train; there were the garrets in which they sat abject, and the park seats where they passed the night.
Up, betimes, rose Peter, seized an axe, hammer, and saw, which he had placed by his bedside, and hied him to the garret. It was but scantily lighted up, as yet, by the frosty fragments of a sunbeam, which began to glimmer through the almost opaque bull's-eyes of the window.
The last rays of the sun, entering through the garret window, were fading from Ginevra's face as she sat sleeping in her chair, and holding her child upon her breast.
Thaddeus tell me, sleeps in the next garret. Then I shall study the great Jones's methods and listen to his not too delicate sarcasms.
It was as well that Becky saw them too from her garret, for she and the two students were chattering and laughing there; they had been joking about the appearance of Becky's grandpapa--whose arrival and departure they had witnessed--but she had time to dismiss them, and have her little room clear before the landlord of the Elephant, who knew that Mrs.
His garret was under the roof of a high, five-storied house and was more like a cupboard than a room.
At last Aniele succeeded in pacifying her, and she essayed the ascent; then, however, she had to be stopped while the old woman cautioned her about the floor of the garret. They had no real floor--they had laid old boards in one part to make a place for the family to live; it was all right and safe there, but the other part of the garret had only the joists of the floor, and the lath and plaster of the ceiling below, and if one stepped on this there would be a catastrophe.
She had moved from the wall of the garret, very near to the bench on which he sat.
The story above, boasted no greater excess than a worm-eaten wash- tub; and the garret landing-place displayed no costlier articles than two crippled pitchers, and some broken blacking-bottles.