gas centrifuge process

gas centrifuge process

[¦gas ′sen·trə‚fyüj ‚präs·əs]
(nucleonics)
A method of isotope separation in which a mixture of isotopes in the gaseous state is spun at high speeds in a centrifuge, and centrifugal forces cause a concentration of heavy isotopes near the walls and light isotopes near the center.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Though gas diffusion had been the all- dominating process for U-235 enrichment for many years, its small separation factor, together with the large energy consumption, encouraged interest over the next 50 years in developing the gas centrifuge process for industrial scale purposes.
The gas centrifuge process already has significant cost advantages over the gas diffusion method and this margin will further increase as improved centrifuges are deployed.